bqcqymox

first_imgWith next month’s IAAF World Indoor Championships overlapping with the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletics Championships (Champs), general secretary of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), Garth Gayle, admits there are challenges, but is confident of putting together a strong team of athletes and officials in particular.The JAAA’s selection committee will meet shortly to select a team to represent Jamaica at the March 17-19 event, which takes place in Portland, USA, but with the interest-hogging ‘Champs’ taking place inside the National Stadium from March 15-19, filling the coaching and management positions on the delegation might provide some headaches for the administration.COACH AVAILABILITYGayle noted that most of the island’s top coaches and management representatives are deeply involved with high-school teams, which will be competing at Champs and are unlikely to be available for the World Indoor Championships.”Naturally, for sure, it (Jamaica’s World Indoor Championships selections) will be affected. Management personnel, for instance, is the first thing that comes to mind,” Gayle told The Gleaner yesterday.”Most of our renowned coaches are also very instrumental and involved with their alma mater, and you look at the press focus on Boys and Girls’ Champs, which is a major event on our calendar.”We have already started some work in looking at what could be a likely combination and try and get the best fit for the national team. Champs does come in at a crucial point, and I would use the world carefully, but it does clash with the World Indoors and provides some challenges,” Gayle admitted.He is, however, confident that the JAAA will be able to put together a strong support staff for the athletes travelling to represent the country in Portland.”We are confident that our discussions with local and international coaches will be positive, and we will be able to send a competent and experienced team of management to accompany the athletes,” said Gayle.Meanwhile, Gayle is expecting that the selection process will be completed well ahead of the February 29 deadline set by the IAAF, and shared that a number of athletes have already indicated their availability.DEADLINE”It seems close, given that the deadline is just a couple of weeks away, but it is not unusual for many of our elite athletes and their coaches to still be deciding whether or not they will be participating at the World Indoors at this point,” Gayle said. “What we know for sure is that we will have the best available team to go out and compete and represent Jamaica at the World Indoor Championships.”We have received indications from a number of athletes, but we can’t give any names at this moment; just to say that it’s not unusual that some of our most elite athletes and their coaches will be weighing the pros and cons, even at this point, especially in an Olympic year,” he added.Jamaica won five medals – one gold, two silver and two bronze – at the last IAAF World Indoor Championships in Sopot in 2014.last_img read more

by

first_imgIt is normally not easy for a ruined life to be turned over without huge costs. Sometimes a ruined life leaves behind only fleeting memories of the bygone years.In this instance, the remains of a ruined life are used as examples to guide the future.Interestingly, sport is a world of its own; and what was not done yesterday can be done today to change the course of its development for the better.Since the horrible year of 2002, when the national soccer team, Lone Star, crashed against the Black Stars of Ghana and dashed the hopes of thousands of soccer fans, Liberian football has not been able to recover its name or its numerous fans.Many who were old enough to remember the years before 2002, could speak with relish of the time when football was football in Liberia. It was the time that a game between Mighty Barrolle and Invincible Eleven was like the greatest match of all time.Those memories remind us of the names like James Salinsa Debbah, described by sports writers at the time as ‘Most Celebrated Player,’ and George Oppong Weah as the ‘Wizard Dribbler.’So, after the loss of Liberia’s chance for the World Cup in 2002, and the advent of DStv, as well as the loss of the leadership of Invincible Eleven and Mighty Barrolle from the league leadership, Liberian football was even described as being dead, by current FA Boss Musa Bility.For the last twelve years, the national team has not been able to ably represent the country and the latest disappointments were those squandered by both junior and senior national teams recently.After those disappointments, inquiring minds want to know what went wrong and what could be done to remedy what happened.Every knowledgeable soccer administrator knows the steps to achieving success in sports. These steps will include selecting quality players from the national league and blending them together with the professionals abroad who will demonstrate their commitment to support the national agenda.There are also technical issues they are not necessary to be described here. However, the fact now is that Liberia is out of 2015 African Cup of Nations; and this makes good that we must begin at the beginning and plan for the 2017’s edition.It is not shameful to admit that both administrators and players, including the fans, did not do their part well for success, since 2002.This is time to advance suggestions of substance without blaming others. The Sports Writers Association of Liberia must join the Liberia Football Association to examine some of the pertinent issues that were overlooked or that did not come into play that could be responsible for the failure of our football development and the way forward.In doing this, we must remove emotion from our actions and be brave enough to take decisions that could change the destiny of football development.Yes, Lone Star is ruined to its bones, and we know that despite ignominious year of 2002, we can change our football destiny but only if we are determined to do so.One interesting element that could get the nation’s football back on its feet is for Chief Patron President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to play more of a leadership role in this revival.This is because recent history tells that it was only when the late president Samuel Kanyon Doe played a leading role in football that Liberia soccer soared over many nations in Africa.President Doe made it mandatory for government ministries to find employment for national football players to give them the security they needed to devote their time to the game.It was the time that George Oppong Weah and his friends were discovered to take on the soccer world. And the result of those efforts produced the best for Liberia, as history will proudly confirm. Now is the time for the chief patron to make a difference.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

by

first_img**SubmittedThe Pimm’s Production Atom Flyers (9 yr olds) played their final All Peace League regular season game on Friday at the Kid’s Arena against the Peace River Atom “A” Mustangs.  The Flyers played strong for the first 30 minutes of the game matching Peace River goal for goal at 4 apiece before allowing 5 unanswered goals late in the second and into the third.  The Flyers put one more past the Mustangs netminder late in the third, but Peace River added one more of their own for a final score of 10 – 5 for the Mustangs.  Getting points for Fort St. John was Jacob Lang (2 goals, 2 assists), Teagan McMullen (2 goals, 1 assist), Aaron Kosinsky (1 goal), and Austin Crossley and Spencer Zazulak with 1 assist each.  Jessie McArthur and Coleman McCaffrey split the netminding responsibilities for the Flyers facing a total of 49 shots. All Peace League playoffs start after the weekend of the 21st February.- Advertisement –last_img read more

by

first_imgUnion members voted Sunday to authorize a strike against Albertsons, giving union leaders the power to call for a walkout. The chain employs 22,000 union members at 249 Albertsons across Southern California. The last round of negotiations three years ago resulted in a 139-day strike against the supermarket chains, one of the nation’s longest such job actions. The chains lost an estimated $2 billion. Albertsons’ parent company, Supervalu, is in a weaker position than Vons or Ralphs, having bought out Albertsons last year and taken on about $7.7 billion in debt. The union filed the complaints Tuesday with the National Labor Relations Board in Los Angeles. The complaints allege the employers “interrogated employees about how they intended to vote,” held “captive audience meetings” during which employers suggested ways to disrupt the strike vote, and sent home early an employee who was participating in bargaining. “Their attempts to intimidate and bully union members are unacceptable,” said Mike Shimpock, a spokesman hired by the unions. “We intend to pursue every possible avenue to guarantee the integrity of future elections and prevent these anti-democratic attacks by the employers,” he said. However, Martin said the employers merely passed out informational fliers and invited employees to watch a video urging them to be informed about the strike vote. When a complaint is filed, the board investigates the claim and can either dismiss it or decide the law has been violated and broker a settlement. Congress passed the National Labor Relations Act in 1935 to guide interactions between unions and private employers. It gives employees the right to form unions and bargain collectively if they choose. Separately, members of the Teamsters union began passing out fliers at seven Albertsons stores, including two in Glendale. The fliers warn shoppers of an “impending labor dispute,” according to Barbara Maynard, a spokeswoman for United Food and Commercial Workers union Local 770. julia.scott@dailynews.com (818) 713-3735160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In three complaints, grocery union officials allege Albertsons intimidated and interrogated employees before a strike authorization vote, a violation of the National Labor Relations Act. The chain denies any wrongdoing. “Every action that we have taken throughout the negotiations themselves have been completely lawful acts,” said Albertsons spokeswoman Stephanie Martin. The United Food and Commercial Workers union and Southern California grocery chains, including Vons and Ralphs, have been trying to hammer out a new three-year contract since March 5, when the old contract was extended. last_img read more

by

first_img0Shares0000West Ham co-owners David Gold and David Sullivan were forced to flee when fans ran riot during Saturday’s game against Burnley while missiles were seen to be thrown in the direction of the executive seats © AFP / Ben STANSALLLONDON, United Kingdom, Mar 11 – West Ham co-owner David Sullivan was hit by a coin amid ugly protests as angry fans ran riot during Saturday’s 3-0 defeat to Burnley at the London Stadium, former player and manager Trevor Brooking said.Sullivan and fellow co-owner David Gold were forced to flee their seats in the directors’ box as fans crowded around them with thrown missiles mixed with chants of “sack the board” and “you killed our club”. Brooking cut a lonely figure as he sat in the directors’ box alone for the final stages of the match that saw West Ham slip to 16th in the Premier League, just three points above the relegation zone.And Brooking said Sunday that Sullivan had been struck.“I think a coin did hit David Sullivan, his glasses,” Brooking told BBC 5 Live.“I didn’t see it myself but I did have that confirmed, which was part of the reason why the people in the directors’ box had to go inside to save any more problems like that.”West Ham defender James Collins (2R) confronts a pitch invader carrying a corner flag during the English Premier League match against Burnley at The London Stadium in east London on March 10, 2018 © AFP / Ben STANSALLWest Ham said an emergency meeting had been called with all London Stadium stakeholders, which includes Gold and Sullivan, whose decision to uproot the club from Upton Park to the site that hosted London’s 2012 Olympic Games has caused resentment.Saturday’s events are being investigated by the Football Association and the Premier League as several West Ham supporters also invaded the pitch.West Ham captain Mark Noble grappled one fan to the floor and team-mate James Collins marched two others away, whilst Burnley players and staff allowed frightened young supporters take shelter on their bench.Brooking believes stewards were not equipped to deal with the situation.“The actual level of aggression was something I couldn’t believe West Ham fans would get involved with,” he added.“A lot of the stewards who are on duty on matchdays are not West Ham people – they’re actually stadium people and sometimes until they get a job there haven’t had any experience dealing with football crowds.“They were quite young and couldn’t deal with the aggression they were faced with.”0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

by

first_imgNEW YORK – It’s a good time to be buying or selling a business even though interest rates are creeping upward – rates are still relatively low, and these days, many companies look like a better investment than the stock market does. But whether you’re on the buy or sell side, it’s better to be doing a deal for your own personal or financial reasons, not only because the climate is good. Dave Clark, who bought a marketing company called Talk Marketing in September, said of his acquisition, “it was a great cure for the unemployment that I was suffering from.” Clark had sold a previous business and gone to work for someone else. It was a bad match, he was unhappy, and he needed to do work that would be fulfilling. So he and a business partner bought the Morristown, N.J.-based company that specializes in word-of-mouth marketing techniques. Unemployment is indeed one of the great incentives for buying or starting a business; people who are downsized with severance packages often invest the money in their own enterprises. Historically, they’ve done so when the economy was considered less than ideal, simply because that’s when companies have tended to lay workers off. “There’s a lot of demand for small and medium-sized businesses right now,” said Roger Murphy, president of Murphy Business & Financial Services Inc., a Clearwater, Fla.-based business brokerage. “A lot of people are fed up with working for someone else.” And, Murphy said, rising rates are not yet a deterrent to buying. Many business loans are set at 2.5 percent above the prime rate, which rose to 7 percent Tuesday when the Fed pushed its benchmark rate up 0.25 percent. Murphy said an additional one- to two-percentage-point rise in the prime will make deals look less favorable, but he said prospective owners will still be interested in buying. They do have to be sure that the company’s cash flow will be enough to service their higher debt costs. The stock market’s current sideways track also makes it a good time to be buying – you’re likely to find more people willing to invest in your enterprise, “When people have millions of dollars (and the stock market is rising), they’re less likely to give their nephew Johnny $100,000 to buy a pizza parlor,” said Andy Cagnetta, president of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based Transworld Business Brokers. “If they can make it in the stock market, why risk it on a business?” Savvy buyers are looking beyond the current business cycle – many, if not most, expect to own a company long term. Chris Palmer, of Little Rock, Ark., recently went into the home-improvement business with a partner. Together they hold a Kitchen Solvers kitchen and bathroom remodeling franchise, and they also own a construction business. The fact that interest rates are rising, and that an end to the housing boom is widely predicted, didn’t dissuade Palmer – if people stop taking out home equity loans to fix up their houses, he and his partner hope to get business from home builders. “That cycle’s a little different than the consumers,” Palmer said. Palmer, who is 24, said this is a good time in his life to be buying a company. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he wanted to go into business for himself. Palmer said he researched between 150 and 200 businesses before deciding to go into home improvement. Sellers often have their own, largely personal, reasons for selling. And brokers say that’s a better approach than bailing because of an economic cycle. “You should sell your business when you have some other reason to sell – liquidating a business is not the biggest windfall event in your business career,” Cagnetta said. Sometimes, the decision to sell all or part of a company is based on what’s good for the business. Micah Portney, owner of ZEO Health, said he needs to find an equity investor or sell the business because it can’t expand further without some cash. The West Nyack, N.Y.-based company sells a dietary supplement called Esdifan on the Internet and in some drugstore chains, but Portney said it can’t advertise adequately or widen its distribution network without outside cash. “It has to get funding and move to the next level, or I need to sell the company or I need to bring it back to (being) a smaller company – but who wants to do that?” he said. Portney acknowledged that selling might mean he will leave ZEO Health. He sounds philosophical about that possibility. “If I have enough money to pay my bills and get myself in a good position, that’ll be what I consider a success,” he said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

by

first_img Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com, or visit the Web site at www.geocities.com/littleangels_angelitos. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. FRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host a holiday dinner-dance, 6:30-11 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Cost: $7 for members, $12 for nonmembers. Tropic Starr band will provide dance music. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m., dancing at 7:30 p.m. Reservations must be made in advance. Call (661) 943-0210. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a New Year’s Eve dance party, 8 p.m.-12:30 a.m. in Lancaster. Reservations and payment must be made in advance. Call (661) 267-2586. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.com or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $7. Club membership: $20. Call (661) 718-8997. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY The Antelope Valley Branch of the Music Teachers Association will meet, 9 a.m. Guest speaker will be Mario Grosse of Mario’s Music Store. Call (661) 944-3466 or (661) 946-2657. Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at the Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept! will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. TODAY J&J Social and Travel Club will dine, 4:30 p.m. at Outback Steakhouse outside the Antelope Valley Mall, 1233 W. Rancho Vista Blvd., Palmdale. An optional movie will follow. Call (661) 267-2586 for reservations by Tuesday. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

by

first_imgTalking Sport’s Charlie Collins gets behind the scenes with some of Glenswilly’s players and clubmen ahead of Sunday’s crunch Ulster Club Final. Simply click to play. DDTV – TALKING SPORT’S CHARLIE COLLINS PREVIEWS THE ULSTER CLUB FINAL was last modified: November 28th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie CollinsglenswillyTalking SportUlster Club Finallast_img read more

by

first_img30 May 2013 South African botanist William Bond from the University of Cape Town has been elected as a foreign associate of the independent United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in recognition of his achievements in original research. Bond, from UCT’s Department of Biological Sciences, joins conservation biologist Richard Cowling from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth as the only two current South African foreign associates of the NAS, UCT announced last week. The NAS is a non-profit society of distinguished scholars in their fields established by an Act of Congress by Abraham Lincoln in 1863 to advance research and knowledge in scientific fields. It provides science and technology advice to members, who are elected to membership by their peers for contributions to research. There are almost 2 200 members, of which 400 are foreign associates and 200 are Nobel Laureates. Foreign associates are non-voting members of the Academy with citizenship outside the US. Bond is the fifth African scientist to be elected to the NAS. Kenya’s Meave Leakey was the only other African to be elected as a foreign associate this year. Leakey is an ecologist with a research interest in the processes that control large-scale vegetation; in particular, his research has looked at how wildfires shape global vegetation. He is an A-rated researcher with South Africa’s National Research Foundation. “African vegetation is particularly interesting and challenging to study because of the complex interplay between climate, fire, large mammal herbivores, people and increasing carbon dioxide, the hidden hand of global change,” Bond said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

by

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Floating through meadows with charm,Buzzing ’round flowers on farms,Pollination facilitator,Everyone loves a pollinator,Until one lands on your arm.Rusty patched bee. Photo by FWS.In March it was made official: the rusty patched bumble bee is the first wild bee in the continental U.S. to gain federal protection on the government’s list of endangered species.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) listed the rusty patched bumble bee under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) effective on March 21, 2017. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on Jan. 11, 2017 with an effective date of Feb. 10, 2017. The effective date was subsequently extended to March 21, 2017 by the Trump Administration.President Donald Trump, though, lifted the hold that had been placed on a plan for federal protections for the bee proposed last fall by the administration of Barack Obama.“Our top priority is to act quickly to prevent extinction of the rusty patched bumble bee. Listing the bee as endangered will help us mobilize partners and focus resources on finding ways right now to stop the decline,” said Tom Melius, FWS Midwest Regional Director. “The rusty patched bumble bee is among a group of pollinators — including the monarch butterfly — experiencing serious declines across the country. Why is this important? Pollinators are small but mighty parts of the natural mechanism that sustains us and our world. Without them, our forests, parks, meadows and shrublands, and the abundant, vibrant life they support, cannot survive, and our crops require laborious, costly pollination by hand.”The rusty patched bumble bee was a common sight 20 years ago, but the species is now on the brink of extinction. Rusty patched bumble bee numbers have plummeted by 87%, leaving small, scattered populations, according to FWS.While bees are clearly important, the listing is a concern for some in agriculture. The widespread habitat for the rusty patched bee (including many parts of Ohio) means a potentially increased regulatory burden on a large part of the country.“While agriculture greatly values conservation, the ESA creates many challenges for farmers and ranchers and often limits agriculture production. Many farms and ranches used for crop production and raising livestock contain habitat which sustains wildlife, including threatened and endangered species,” said Shiloh Perry with the American Farm Bureau Federation. “Farmers are often restricted from fully utilizing their land due to the ESA’s strict regulations when endangered species or critical habitat are present. These regulations affect not only farmers’ occupations and ability to stay profitable, but families and homesteads as well. Working in agriculture is often more than an occupation; it is a lifestyle and frequently a family endeavor. The increased regulatory burden of the ESA negatively affects rural quality of life and jeopardizes the overall agriculture economy.”The listing can also lead to litigation.“The statute allows special interest groups to sue anyone believed to be in violation of the act. Too often radical environmental activists target citizens, frequently farmers and ranchers, who practice positive conservation efforts,” Perry said. “Resulting legal costs disrupt the rural economy, are burdensome to taxpayers and provide no resources for active species conservation and recovery efforts.”At this point, Ohio State University Extension entomologist Andy Michel said that the implications of listing the rusty patched bumble are still uncertain for Ohio agriculture.“It’s unclear as to what impact, if any, this has for Ohio ag at this point. Yes, this species can be found in Ohio — there are also other bumble bee species — and yes its numbers are decreasing for reasons that are unknown, although there is a long list of suspects,” Michel said. “Putting the endangered label on it may add protections and regulations against knowingly destroying the bumblebee’s habitat and habitat creation (it is a ground nester). But I think that would be hard to enforce as we can’t expect farmers to walk their fields looking for this particular species.”Michel said existing regulations probably already address the issue.“We have guidelines, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture has regulations, for conserving pollinators in agronomic crops and I think all of these guidelines will also work for helping conserve this particular bumble bee species,” Michel said. “If it is like the other bees that visit flowers on field edges we need to be careful with drift, either by spraying or dust releases from seed treatments. So until we get more specific information, we should follow the already suggested guideline to protect all pollinators as best we can.”last_img read more

by