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first_imgGM’s net profit of 11 cents per share for the January-March period was down 90 percent from the year-ago period, when it made $602 million, or $1.06 per share. The company blamed the decline on troubles in the residential mortgage operation at its former financial arm, GMAC Financial Services. The nation’s largest automaker sold a 51 percent stake in GMAC to private-equity investors last year but still owns 49 percent of the business. Chief Financial Officer Fritz Henderson said GM lost $115 million from its stake in GMAC. The financial company on Wednesday posted a first-quarter loss of $305 million, mainly due to a $910 million loss in home mortgages. GM also said its year-ago results were inflated by a one-time after-tax gain of $395 million due to the sale of its equity ownership of Suzuki Motors. GM’s stock slid even though the company’s North American performance improved. GM lost an adjusted $85 million on its core operations, compared with an adjusted loss of $251 million a year ago. The company also reported record vehicle sales of 2.26 million worldwide and showed improvements in its automotive operations in the latest quarter. Its Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Africa and Middle East regions made an adjusted $351 million, fueling the overall profit. GM also reported $32 million of special items largely due to restructuring in its Europe and Asia Pacific divisions. Excluding special items, GM’s net income was $94 million, or 17 cents per share, compared with net income of $350 million, or 62 cents per share, in the first quarter of 2006. Those results fell short of Wall Street expectations. GM’s revenue fell to $43.9 billion for the quarter, down 16 percent from $52.4 billion in the same period a year ago. GM said the decline was almost entirely due to no longer including GMAC revenue in GM’s consolidated results. Henderson said the North American performance improved despite GM’s decision to cut production by 192,000 units for the first quarter as it tried to reduce low-profit fleet sales and incentives. The average transaction price per vehicle in North America rose by about $1,000 year-over-year, the company said. GM is on track to reduce annual costs by $9 billion this year, Henderson said. By the end of last year, it had achieved an annual cost reduction of $6.8 billion, largely from the departure of thousands of hourly workers through buyout or early-retirement offers. But the performance still wasn’t enough, even for Henderson. “When we look at the results in North America, it’s good to see improvement. It’s not good to be operating at a small loss, clearly, given where we are in our product cycle,” he said. “Frankly, our business is not generating the kind of returns that we expect, and clearly we have to continue to make significant improvements.” In November 2005, GM announced a huge restructuring plan to stem billions in losses. It said it would cut more than a quarter of its North American manufacturing jobs and close 12 facilities by 2008.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! DETROIT – By recent Detroit standards, two straight profitable quarters by an automaker is a mega-achievement. But for General Motors Corp., losses in North America overshadowed Thursday’s announcement that it made $62 million in the first three months of the year for a second consecutive quarter of black ink. Even though the Dow Jones industrial average is in the midst of its longest advance since 1955, GM’s stock dropped by more than 5 percent Thursday. Some industry analysts questioned whether the company can make money on its home pavement because it already has cut billions in costs and rolled out scads of new cars and trucks. “My worry is if not now, it’s not going to be easier getting costs out or holding the revenue line, the market share number,” said Kevin Tynan of Argus Research, a New York-based equity research company. “If it hasn’t happened by now, it’s certainly not going to get any easier.” last_img read more

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first_img Shell-shocked Sunderland players react to their 8-0 drubbing at Southampton Sunderland players have offered to refund the ticket costs to fans who witnessed their 8-0 Premier League humiliation at Southampton on Saturday.More than 2,500 Black Cats supporters who made the long trip down to the south coast will be able to claim back the £24 cost of admission, or have the sum donated to city-based children’s hospice Grace House instead.Skipper John O’Shea said: “We win and lose as a team, players, staff and fans.“However we wanted to acknowledge and thank the supporters who travelled such a long way to give us their backing and despite everything, stayed with us until the final whistle.”Goalkeeper Vito Mannone suggested the idea immediately after the horror show, with his own team-mates responsible for two of the goals.The offer will cost the players in excess of £60,000.Fans have until 5pm on Wednesday, November 5 to submit a claim by returning their match ticket either in person at the Stadium of Light ticket office or by post to SAFC (Refunds), PO Box 165, Sunderland SR5 1WF, enclosing their name, address and customer number.Any funds which are not claimed by the deadline will go to Grace House, which provides respite, palliative and end of life care for children and young people throughout the north-east who have life-shortening conditions for which there is no known cure. 1last_img read more

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first_imgAA Ireland is warning motorists to be extremely cautious on many of Co Donegal’s roads today as the cold spell continues.Donegal will escape the worst of the snow later today, with flurries however expected over Inishowen and Fanad by the afternoon.Temperatures fell overnight to -3C in some inland areas of Donegal. This has caused some problems for drivers this morning, with black ice and fog reported on some roads.Major routes have been gritted by Donegal County Council staff. ROADS WARNING AS FREEZING TEMPERATURES BITE was last modified: January 21st, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ROADS WARNING AS FREEZING TEMPERATURES BITElast_img read more

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first_imgFollowing the Drake Invitational, the Bulldogs are scheduled to compete at the ITA All-American Championship Oct. 1-5 in Tulsa, Okla.Print Friendly Version ‘D’ Singles Bracket Play begins Friday at 4 p.m. and continues Saturday and Sunday with matches starting at 9 a.m. each day. Drake head coach Davidson Kozlowski returns seniors Ben Clark, Vinny Gillespie and Tom Hands, junior Barny Thorold and sophomore Finley Hall who all earned All-Summit League honors last season. The group helped the Bulldogs win the Summit Tournament championship and earn the program’s 11th trip to the NCAA Tournament. Also returning are redshirt seniors Calum MacGeoch and Bayo Phillips, the duo who garnered All-MVC honors in 2017. MacGeoch and Phillips each redshirted last year due to injuries. Story Links The invitational will feature an eight team field including Creighton, Drake, Gustavus Adolphus, Nebraska, Northern Colorado, North Dakota, Northwest Missouri State and Omaha. ‘B’ Doubles Bracket center_img ‘B’ Singles Bracket ‘A’ Doubles Bracket ‘C’ Singles Bracket DES MOINES, Iowa –  The Drake University men’s tennis team kicks off its 2018 fall season by hosting the Drake Invitational Sept. 21-23 at the Roger Knapp Tennis Center. ‘A’ Singles Bracket last_img read more

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first_imgA report about alleged serious planning irregularities in Donegal remains unpublished over a year after the government received legal advice on its contents from the attorney-general.About a decade ago Gerard Convie, a former senior planner at Donegal county council, submitted almost two dozen alleged examples of rule breaches at the local authority.These included several cases where homes were built in breach of regulations that protect areas of natural beauty. The Sunday Times yesterday reported that after multiple delays, a report on his complaints was submitted to the government in June 2017. The attorney-general submitted his legal advice a year later but Eoghan Murphy, the housing minister, has yet to decide whether he will publish it.Darragh O’Brien, Fianna Fáil’s housing spokesman, said that his party would ask Mr Murphy for an update in the interests of transparency.The Department of Housing and Planning issued a response that was nearly identical to one given to The Times when it asked about the same issue in November. “Following receipt of the attorney’s advice, departmental officials considered the matter further and prepared a submission for the minister’s consideration, including an assessment of the options available to the minister in terms of publication or dissemination,” a spokesman said. “The minister is currently considering the report and the extensive legal advice received.”It has been almost ten years since Mr Convier, who was a planner at Donegal county council for more than two decades, came forward with his allegations. For full story see https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/donegal-planning-breach-report-ready-to-publish-for-over-a-year-vzt7dhf5bReport into planning irregularities in Donegal remains unpublished was last modified: August 26th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalGerard Convieplanninglast_img read more

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first_imgTo celebrate the launch of the airlineratings.com website we are giving away $5000 cash to one lucky winner. Simply click here, fill in your details and you will go in the draw to win this fabulous prize. Don’t forget to like us on facebook too!!last_img

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorOMAHA (DTN) — Looking to right the ship with Midwest farmers, the Trump administration on Friday released its long-awaited proposal to restore the Renewable Fuel Standard and reallocate billions of gallons of biofuels granted in waivers to the petroleum industry.The Environmental Protection Agency will propose rules to ensure that more than 15 billion gallons of ethanol is blended in 2020 and require higher volumes of biodiesel to be blended as well. EPA noted, “This will include accounting for relief expected to be provided for small refineries.”The proposals will go through a rule-making process that includes seeking public comments.EPA drew scorn in August after the agency announced 31 small refiners had been granted exemptions from the RFS, accounting for 1.4 billion gallons of lost demand for ethanol and biodiesel. That led to negotiations at the White House involving EPA, USDA and key senators to reach a deal.Under the new proposal, EPA will account for small-refinery exemptions starting in 2020 with a three-year rolling average of volumes waived. The proposal will not account for prior-year waivers already granted to small refiners, an EPA official announced on a call Friday.Along with ensuring 15 billion gallons of conventional ethanol, EPA will also start a rulemaking process to streamline labeling and remove other barriers for the sale of E15 nationally. USDA also will work to provide more infrastructure for biofuels, such as increasing blender pumps at retail outlets.EPA stated the agency will also work to provide more transparency for Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs), the credits used by the petroleum industry to provide compliance with the RFS. Those RIN prices have fallen dramatically over the past two years and dropped precipitously after EPA announced its latest small-refinery waivers.Kevin Ross, an Iowa farmer and president of the National Corn Growers Association, said NCGA was grateful for President Trump listening to corn farmers’ concerns. Ross had specifically talked to Trump about the small-refinery exemptions when the president spoke at an Iowa ethanol plant in June.“Corn farmers weren’t shy in telling the president that the impact of these waivers would lead to significant consequences for farmers, folks working at ethanol and biodiesel plants, and the countless other rural jobs that depend on this market,” Ross said.Monte Shaw, executive director of the Iowa Renewable Fuels Association, said the most important aspect of EPA’s proposal is that it will restore the RFS volumes by factoring in small-refinery exemptions into the annual volume blends.“At the end of the day, we want 15 billion gallons to be 15 billion gallons,” Shaw said.Shaw said the proposal amounts to “a tourniquet to stop the bleeding” of demand volumes that have hurt the biofuels industry and caused both ethanol and biodiesel plants to close, idle or reduce production.“What the proposal does is it puts on a tourniquet to stop the bleeding,” Shaw said. “Do we need a blood transfusion to feel better? Yes we do. There are some other parts of the proposal that starts a blood transfusion, to continue the analogy. But if you don’t stop the bleeding, nothing else matters. This proposal stops the bleeding.”As of the end of September, at least 18 ethanol plants had idled production with many more cutting back. The biodiesel industry has seen nine plants close, and others cut production, as well.In praising the announcement, Geoff Cooper, president and CEO of the Renewable Fuels Association, said Friday’s announcement “marks the beginning — not the end — of an EPA regulatory process and much work needs to be done.”Along with the praise from the biofuels industry and farm groups, the American Petroleum Institute criticized the plan.“The administration’s decision to raise the ethanol mandate is a rushed and arbitrary action that puts American drivers at risk with little, if any, benefit to farmers,” the group stated.U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, told reporters Friday that the proposal outlined by the president and EPA is exactly the way the RFS was meant to function.“It sets us on a plan to blend more ethanol.”He added that the plan was basically agreed to at a meeting Sept. 12 at the White House, but finally detailed on paper by EPA.“These are promises made and promises kept by President Trump,” Grassley said. “President Trump has made it clear he is an ally of corn and soybean farmers, as well as ethanol and biodiesel producers.”The White House also announced on Friday that Vice President Mike Pence will visit Iowa next week.Countering Grassley was fellow Republican, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, who said any plan to transfer small-refinery obligations to other refiners “will do more harm than good.”“No one should be surprised if it leads to closed refineries, lost jobs, and higher fuel prices,” Barrasso said. “Refineries — both large and small — employ millions of Americans nationwide. In my home state of Wyoming alone, refineries employ thousands. This proposal risks mass layoffs and higher gasoline and diesel prices. It’s not a winning strategy for American workers or our nation’s economy.”On a press call Friday, EPA officials were asked why farmers should believe the agency will live up to the RFS levels set by Congress. An EPA official stated the agency is accepting comments on its proposal and will blend 15 billion gallons in 2020.Chris Clayton can be reached at Chris.Clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(AG/BAS)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. 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first_imgRole of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts Tags:#mobile#web center_img One of the first appearances of a mobile phone in a major Hollywood movie was in director Billy Wilder’s 1954 Audrey Hepburn classic, “Sabrina”. Today, millions of phone owners across the world could recreate “Sabrina” from start to finish from the comfort of their hand held devices. In fact, if we chose to, we could mobilize a global streaming event. But let’s be honest, the last thing we want to do is sit inside story boarding a pre-existing movie. It’s the summer! Get outside, grab your phone and capture some of the great moments happening around you. Below are some of our favorite mobile video services. 1. Ustream: Ustream recently announced the launch of their Recording App for the iPhone 3GS. The app can syndicate video to Ustream, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook. Ustream also lets mobile viewers discover new videos by common hashtags in the Media Feed. The company’s recently launched a white label solution for conference and business broadcasting. 2. 12cast: After much anticipation, 12seconds.tv released their video application for the iPhone 3GS. The app allows users to create a short 12 second video clip and from here they can share the video’s short URL with their friends through Twitter. 3. Twitvid and Posterous: Both Twitvid and Posterous allow users to create videos on their mobile phones and email them to be uploaded to the site. With Twitvid, friends receive a DM message with a link to the newest video. ReadWriteWeb recently covered Twitvid in a round up of Twitter video apps. Meanwhile, with Posterous, your files are instantly converted and embedded as a flash player on your site. 4.LivecastBambuser and Flixwagon: Livecast, Bambuser and Flixwagon are all similar services that allow users to stream videos live to their channels, blogs and Facebook accounts. Depending on your community preference you can upload vlogs, short films and vignettes. 5. Qik: Qik allows users to stream live videos to their channels, blogs, Facebook, Twitter and Justin.tv accounts. One nice feature of the Qik video for Android is that users can trim their clips via their phones before uploading them. ReadWriteWeb named Qik one of the top 100 products of 2008.6.Kyte: While it doesn’t support live streaming, Kyte’s iPhone 3GS app allows users to record video and upload it to their channels in an extremely easy manner. The service also offers branded mobile sites for big name celebrities. We know we’re only skimming the surface. If your favorite app isn’t listed above, let us know about it in the comments. dana oshiro The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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first_imgTags:#Data Services#international#Location#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market marshall kirkpatrick Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Let’s say you’ve got a whole pile of free-form text content and you want to determine what geographic locations are discussed in it. And let’s say you want to do that while you’re rushing to respond to a catastrophic earthquake. What would you do?Disaster response network Ushahidi has been using software called Yahoo Placemaker for this function, as many other developers do. But this week the organization announced that it is adopting an open source alternative called GeoDict. GeoDict, which was created by ReadWriteWeb contributor Pete Warden, detects, standardizes and returns coordinates for text regarding 2.7 million locations around the world. As a part of the deal, Warden has officially joined Ushahidi parent organization SwiftRiver. We wrote about how to use both Yahoo Placemaker and GeoDict here in October. Warden says that SwiftRiver will be launching a hosted GeoDict API soon. He also says he’s hard at work expanding the list of places GeoDict can recognize. Why not just use a larger online database? “One key requirement for Ushahidi is that the service works even when an internet connection is down, for processing documents, etc.,” Warden says. “There may be SMS messages still coming in for example, even when the web is inaccessible. So having a service that can be installed locally on a machine is a big deal.”Ushahidi describes itself as “a non-profit tech company that develops free and open source software for information collection, visualization and interactive mapping.” The name is from the Swahili word for “testimony” or “witness.” According to the organization’s Wikipedia entry, it “created a website (http://legacy.ushahidi.com) in the aftermath of Kenya’s disputed 2007 presidential election that collected eyewitness reports of violence sent in by email and text-message and placed them on a Google map.” It’s notable that it was Kenyan political corruption and violence that also propelled Wikileaks to the forefront of many peoples’ minds internationally after that organization won an Amnesty International media award in 2009 for its work regarding Kenya.Two weeks ago, Ushahidi released a new mobile check-in app ala Foursquare called Crowdmap:CI.As ReadWriteWeb’s Audrey Watters wrote earlier this month:Crowdmap is a easy-to-install, hosted version of Ushahidi – the equivalent of WordPress.com blogs for WordPress, perhaps.The new tool Crowdmap:CI (or Crowdmap Checkins) will function on both Ushahidi and Crowdmap and will allow users to create ad-hoc check-in communities, complete with mobile apps and web portals. Crowdmap:CI is designed to further simplify the creation of annotated location points. As Jon Gosier writes in the blog post announcing the new product, “Sometimes users just want to drop quick notes that represent data points allowing them to enter details later. For instance: the locations of wells while touring a rural village, or potholes around a metropolitan city, or simply dropping pins while on a vacation for the memories of where to return to. Crowdmap:CI is an attempt to make this data entry process quicker, allowing users to focus on location first, and everything else later.”About its relationship with GeoDict, SwiftRiver posted the following:You’ll see us contribute our staff, time and resources to the development of GeoDict (because it’s an open source project aligned with our greater mission). GeoDict’s community will also actively contribute back to that code, and hopefully they’ll feel welcome enough that they’ll also contribute to SwiftRiver and Ushahidi code base as well.GeoDict will be fully integrated into the Swift Web Services family of API products which we offer as both free and paid services, but also as open-source code for anyone out there to use on their own terms.About WardenBy adding Warden to its team, SwiftRiver gains one of the most interesting independent data scientists on the web. A former Apple engineer, Warden hit the news last February when he announced plans to release Facebook data from hundreds of millions of users to the broader research community. Legal pressure from Facebook quickly ended those plans, but Warden performed some analysis on his own.“There’s so many interesting ways to slice the data – especially as I’m starting to get changes over time,” he told ReadWriteWeb. “I’m also trying to map out political networks in aggregate; how polarized the fans of particular politicians are – so how likely a Sarah Palin fan is to have any friends who are fans of Obama, and how that varies with location too. One of my favorite results is that Texans are more likely to be fans of the Dallas Cowboys than God…“Nobody thinks about how much valuable information they’re generating just by friending people and fanning pages. It’s like we’re constantly voting in a hundred different ways every day. And I’m a starry-eyed believer that we’ll be able to change the world for the better using that neglected information. It’s like an x-ray for the whole country – we can see all sorts of hidden details of who we’re friends with, where we live, what we like.”Warden frequently cites the use of GIS software in detecting inequitable distribution of public services between areas inhabited by different demographic groups as big inspiration for his work.Warden’s other work includes the creation of OpenHeatMap, an open source service aimed at journalists for easy creation of heatmap displays of data and authorship of the forthcoming O’Reilly book Data Source Handbook: A Guide to Public Data, due out next month.We’re honored to count Pete among our team here at ReadWriteWeb. You can read his articles via this link.center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts last_img read more

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first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Related Posts Why You Love Online Quizzes Tags:#APIs#Explainer brian proffittcenter_img How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? It’s getting harder to turn around in tech without bumping into some reference to APIs, or application programming interfaces. Here at ReadWrite, for instance, we’ve recently discussed Google’s flip-flops on the open Calendar API and why Pinterest hasn’t made its APIs public yet. I’ve even put forth the notion of getting my own API.If you work with APIs, you already know why they’re important. But the rest of you may well be wondering: What are APIs, and why do we care so much about them?This is your story.APIs: Windows To The CodeIn the simplest terms, APIs are sets of requirements that govern how one application can talk to another. APIs aren’t at all new; whenever you use a desktop or laptop, APIs are what make it possible to move information between programs—for instance, by cutting and pasting a snippet of a LibreOffice document into an Excel spreadsheet. System-level APIs makes it possible for applications like LibreOffice to run on top of an OS like Windows in the first place.On the Web, APIs make it possible for big services like Google Maps or Facebook to let other apps “piggyback” on their offerings. Think about the way Yelp, for instance, displays nearby restaurants on a Google Map in its app, or the way some video games now let players chat, post high scores and invite friends to play via Facebook, right there in the middle of a game.See also: The New API Gold RushAPIs do all this by “exposing” some of a program’s internal functions to the outside world in a limited fashion. That makes it possible for applications to share data and take actions on one another’s behalf without requiring developers to share all of their software’s code. Code-sharing on that scale wouldn’t just ruffle the feathers of programmers who’d rather keep it secret; it would also be grossly inefficient.That’s true even for open-source programs. Who has the time to comb through all the code for somebody else’s application—which, trust me, can be awfully messy—just to use one function? (It’s also possible to run into tricky licensing issues if you’re not careful.)APIs simplify all that by limiting outside program access to a specific set of features—often enough, requests for data of one sort or another. Feel free to think of them as doors, windows or levers if you like. Whatever the metaphor, APIs clearly define exactly how a program will interact with the rest of the software world—saving time, resources and potentially nasty legal entanglements along the way.How APIs WorkThese days, APIs are especially important because they dictate how developers can create new apps that tap into big Web services—social networks like Facebook or Pinterest, for instance, or utilities like Google Maps or Dropbox. The developer of a game app, for instance, can use the Dropbox API to let users store their saved games in the Dropbox cloud instead of working out some other cloud-storage option from scratch.In one sense, then, APIs are great time savers. They also offer user convenience in many cases; Facebook users undoubtedly appreciate the ability to sign into many apps and Web sites using their Facebook ID—a feature that relies upon Facebook APIs to work.Viewed more broadly, though, APIs make possible a sprawling array of Web-service “mashups,” in which developers use mix and match APIs from the likes of Google or Facebook or Twitter to create entirely new apps and services. In many ways, the widespread availability of APIs for major services is what’s made the modern Web experience possible.When you search for nearby restaurants in the Yelp app for Android, for instance, it will plot their locations on Google Maps instead of creating its own maps. Via the Google Maps API, the Yelp app passes the information it wants plotted—restaurant addresses, say, along with the Yelp star rating and more—to an internal Google Maps function that then returns a Map object with restaurant pins in it at the proper locations. Which Yelp can then display inside its app. (On iOS, Yelp taps Apple’s Maps API for the same purpose.)We see APIs like this all the time. Elsewhere on this page you should see the icons to share this article on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn or Reddit. These are just links that call on the APIs associated with each of those services to allow users to Tweet or post about an article without leaving the site itself. APIs also allow our comment system, run by a service called Disqus, to accept user comments and then display them right here on ReadWrite without our intervention.When APIs Go BadOf course, just because an API is available now, that doesn’t mean it always will be. Twitter, for instance, notoriously limited third-party applications’ use of its APIs just over a year ago—a move that had the practical effect of killing off alternative Twitter clients and driving users to Twitter’s own site and apps, where Twitter can “monetize” them by displaying ads … er, promoted tweets. Twitter insisted the move was necessary to deliver a “unified” Twitter experience.Other examples abound. Companies can shut down services and APIs that your applications depend on—or they can go out of business entirely, as Memolane and Everyblock did last February. And let’s not get started on all of the services that Google regularly shuts down when it doesn’t see any profit in them—like Google Health or more recently, Google Reader. These kinds of service shutdowns can leave you in a lurch if your application depends on those APIs to function.There’s still more than a hint of the Wild West in today’s API landscape. But none of these complications seem likely to dampen developer enthusiasm for APIs, nor that of users for the incredible variety of apps and services they make possible.This article is part of our API series. You can download a high-resolution version of the landscape featuring 270 companies here. Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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