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first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Nov. 21 guest column, “Ending poverty takes more than charity”: No one should discount the extent to which charity and charitability can alleviate systemic poverty. Mother Theresa reminded the world that charity and love are the same. What the world needs is to love without getting tired, she added.But research corroborates that Americans are increasingly less charitable, and that donors lack confidence that their contributions actually help those in need. Too often, Americans rely on policy makers, protesters and political activists for social change, which is always ill-advised especially in a world of hyper-partisan politicking.Although lawmakers and loudspeakers have their place, a lasting solution for poverty will only come from reinvigorating a nationwide spirit of charity. Nothing else will suffice. To truly help the disadvantaged and suffering, Americans must love without getting tired.Zack VoellLeesburg, VirginiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

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first_imgBoth the Republican-controlled Senate and the Democratic-majority House of Representatives would have to agree on a postponement.”I don’t see it happening,” said Capri Cafaro, a former Democratic member of the Ohio state senate who teaches at American University. “It is unlikely a Democratic majority would want to postpone the election.”Even during the Civil War between the North and South, the 1864 election was held as scheduled with Abraham Lincoln winning another term.Can a candidate be replaced?Trump’s Republican Party and Biden’s Democratic Party both have rules outlining how to fill a vacancy on the presidential ticket should one occur.In the case of Trump’s GOP, the 168 members of the Republican National Committee could vote to select the replacement.The RNC could also reconvene its national convention of more than 2,500 delegates to select a new candidate but time pressure probably makes this unworkable.A simple majority would be all that is needed to choose a new candidate in either scenario.In the case of the Democrats, a new presidential nominee would be selected by the nearly 450 members of the Democratic National Committee.Can a replacement candidate be on the ballot?Probably not. “The problem at this point is that we are so far along in this 2020 election that not only have people cast ballots, ballots have already been printed,” Cafaro said.”You really don’t have enough time to reprint ballots which say Mike Pence or Kamala Harris,” she said, referring to the Republican and Democratic vice presidential nominees respectively.More than 3.1 million Americans have already cast their ballots, according to a tally kept by the US Elections Project at the University of Florida.In addition, deadlines for ballot access vary from state to state and they have already passed in most cases.What about the Electoral College?While the United States holds a popular vote, the president is elected by an absolute majority of the 538 members of the Electoral College.In every state but two (Nebraska and Maine), the candidate winning the majority of the popular vote in that state wins all that state’s electors.Nothing in the Constitution obliges electors to vote in one way or another but the Supreme Court ruled in July that states could fine so-called “faithless electors” who do not respect the popular vote.The members of the Electoral College will gather in their respective states on December 14 and vote for president and vice president.In the event a candidate dies or withdraws before the Electoral College casts its votes, things could get messy.Individual state laws come into play but each party could theoretically direct its electors to vote for a replacement candidate.   On Jan. 6, 2021, Congress will certify the results, with the winner being sworn in as president on Jan. 20.  Topics : A US presidential nominee has never died or had to withdraw from a White House race this close to an election.But President Donald Trump’s hospitalization for coronavirus just a month from the November 3 vote has raised the question of what happens if such an event should occur. Trump is 74 years old and while his opponent Joe Biden is reportedly in relatively good health at 77 he is the oldest Democratic nominee ever. Here is a look at some of the potential scenarios in the event a nominee exits the race:Delay the presidential election?Unlikely. Congress set the date for the election and this one has already been scheduled, as per US law for the Tuesday after the first Monday in November.last_img read more

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first_imgThe land at 10 Rupert St, Windsor in the foreground with the view of the city behind. Picture: realestate.com.auThe block of land is in a cul-de-sac and the sale includes architecturally designed plans for two luxury three-level homes. Partial ground work has already begun on the site including storm water and sewerage connections.The site has views back across the Brisbane city skyline.The listing said with the owner now located overseas they were keen to sell. Saia Fainga’a has listed the land he owns at Windsor for sale. Picture: Annette DewIT would appear the move to England by rugby union star Saia Fainga’a and his family means he no longer needs the block of land he forked out $1.031 million for in 2012.The cleared land at 10 Rupert St, Windsor, has just been listed for sale.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach Northless than 1 hour agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Property records reveal when Fainga’a bought it, there was an old home on the 693sq m site. That has since been cleared and it is being offered for sale through Meaghan Bakker of Ray White New Farm with no asking price.last_img read more

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first_imgTWO DEVELOPMENTS give encouragement to the hope we expressed last month (RG 7.97 p427) that railways in the southern half of Africa are starting to benefit from the laying down of arms.A 51% interest in six management and operating concessions in Mozambique’s Maputo Development Corridor is being offered for sale as part of an industrial development strategy for the region. The six concessions cover the 93 km from Komatipoort to Moamba and Maputo, the 528 km Limpopo line from Chicualacuala to Maputo, the 69 km route from Goba in Swaziland, the harbour at Maputo, and Mozambique Ports & Railways’ (CFM) motive power workshops. Bids were due back by July 11, and the Ministry of Transport & Communications hopes to let all six by the year end. CFM will retain a one-third stake, and South Africa’s Spoornet is likely to take a share.Bidders are being asked to look at 15 to 25 year concessions and to undertake rehabilitation and investment. For example, the track between Komatipoort and Maputo needs attention if it is to handle the traffic suggested. The Mozambique’s projects are likely to be debated at the Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Programme seminar on railway concessioning in Abidjan on October 13-14.The second encouraging development is the resumption of rail traffic in and out of the Democratic Republic of Congo following an agreement between Spoornet and SNCC that sees the South African motive power being restored to use. Spoornet will continue negotiations with SNCC to work out some form of permanent relationship. Badly needed revenue from copper exports should soon be flowing again. olast_img read more

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first_imgThe disclosures should be made in “mainstream” financial reports and subject to the associated quality assurance.Giving a flavour of some of the feedback the taskforce collected during the first phase of its work, Picot said investors had expressed “a lot of interest” in scenario analysis – “this concept of getting companies to describe their thinking about what the 2-degree pathway might mean for their business model”.He also said the taskforce discussed “at length” what short and long-term means, in a nod to the topic of the preceding keynote speech by Sarah Williamson of FCLT Global.Picot said the taskforce would be making recommendations for disclosure structured around four main thematic areas – governance, strategy, risk management, and metrics and targets.They will be supported by recommendations about specific disclosures that organisations can include in financial filings. The taskforce will be recommending the publication of a 2-degree scenario and “appropriate” greenhouse gas emissions; he said the disclosures the taskforce would be recommending were “really quite comprehensive”.There will also be supplementary sector-specific guidance for organisations in the financial sector – asset owners, asset managers, banks and insurance companies – and certain companies in the non-financial sector.  Picot and his panellists discussed the merits or otherwise of disclosures being voluntary, with Picot saying he thought it was sensible to “allow the marketplace to experiment first” before hard-coding requirements.   Olivier Rousseau, chief executive at France’s Fonds de reserves pour les retraites (FRR), defended compulsory disclosure on the basis of the positive way in which Article 173 of the French environmental and energy transition law had bedded itself in.This requires institutional investors to report on their exposure and approach to carbon risk but without prescribing how this is done and leaving it to investors to decide.Rousseau said the law had been well received across the world and that it was “a good start”, but he urged the government – France’s, as well as other countries’ – to do more.“Don’t stop there – put a price on carbon, guys,” he said.Thomas Kusterer, CFO of energy supply company Energie Baden-Württemberg (EnBW) in Germany, said a voluntary approach made sense in the short term but that, ultimately, disclosures such as that being proposed by the FSB taskforce needed to be made mandatory.Kusterer is a member of the TCFD, as a representative of a “data preparer”.He had earlier on the panel said that company reporting on carbon risk and other climate change-related environmental impact risks needed to improve.Kusterer said the transition risk associated with climate change was “impacting business models as we speak”.He said more companies needed to focus on transition risk, as well as other impacts of climate change, such as that on agricultural companies.“We are not disclosing these kinds of risks appropriately for investors to make a really informed decision and to ensure the right capital allocation can be made by investors,” he said. The Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) is poised to announce recommendations for “quite comprehensive” disclosures next week, according to an adviser to the group.The TCFD will be launching the consultation on its recommendations – for voluntary reporting of climate-related information by companies and investors – next Wednesday, 14 December.Addressing delegates at IPE’s annual conference in Berlin on Friday, Russell Picot, special adviser to the taskforce, stressed that the taskforce’s aim was “not to create the 401st detailed greenhouse gas emissions framework”.“We’re not trying to arbitrate between those 400 frameworks,” he said. “What we’re trying to achieve is to significantly improve the narrative and quantitative climate-risk disclosures that need to be made right across the investment chain.”last_img read more

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first_imgPension scheme trustees will have to set out the extent to which they take account of members’ views on non-financial matters in the development of their investment strategy under proposals put forward by the UK government today.Non-financial matters would include – but not be limited to – matters of ethics, social impact and “present and future quality of life”.Trustees would have to produce a statement explaining the extent to which these views would be taken into account when they prepare or revise the scheme’s statement of investment principles (SIP).The proposed requirement was revealed as part of the launch of a keenly anticipated consultation from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) on trustees’ duties. The government has also proposed amending the investment regulations for occupational pension schemes to require trustees to set out how they take account of financially material considerations, including those stemming from environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) matters such as climate change.The current investment regulations require trustees to report their policy on the extent to which, if at all, they take into account “social, environmental or ethical matters in relation to investments”. In 2014 the Law Commission said this wording was unhelpful and the government today said it had proven to be “confusing and misleading”.Lawyers welcomed the government’s proposed rewording, saying it should help clear up any confusion in trustees’ minds – even though legally they were already obliged to take account of financially material ESG issues. Esther McVey, Secretary of State for Work and PensionsA more significant change, however, according to Stuart O’Brien, partner at Sackers, lay in the proposed requirement for trustees of defined contribution (DC) schemes to annually review and report on how they take account of financially material ESG factors. “This is really going to push this onto the agendas of DC trustees in a way that it perhaps hasn’t been to date,” he said.‘Member view statement’ requirement raises concerns  Lawyers expressed concern about the requirement for a statement on members’ views, however.Rosalind Connor, partner at ARC Pensions Law, said the requirement would encourage people to think that trustees need to take into account members’ views as a matter of law.“It is a great misunderstanding a lot of people have that trustees have to do what the members want them to do, and that isn’t the case under trust law,” she said.Sackers’ O’Brien said the requirement to have a statement about members’ views was probably the least helpful of the regulatory changes the government had proposed.“My concern is that this will be the bit everyone latches onto and there’ll be some rush to do member surveys on all sorts of things without thinking about what trustees are actually going to do on the back of it,” he said. “I think it could get really confusing.”The government’s press release about the changes was misleading, O’Brien added.In the release – headlined ‘Billions invested by pension schemes to be used for social good under new regulations’ – secretary of state for work and pensions Esther McVey said: “These new regulations will empower savers all over Britain, ensuring that their voices are heard when their savings are invested.”Another change proposed by the government is that trustees should be obliged to set out their policies in relation to the stewardship of their investments, including engagement with investee firms.Under the current regulations trustees are only required to report their policy, if they have one, on the exercise of voting rights.The consultation runs until 16 July 2018. The main proposals Trustees must update or prepare their statement of investment principles (SIP) to set out:how they take account of financially material considerations, including (but not limited to) those arising from environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) considerations, including climate change;policies in relation to the stewardship of the investments, including engagement with investee firms and the exercise of voting rights.When trustees next prepare or update their SIP they must prepare a “statement on members’ views”, setting out the extent to which they will take account of the views which, in their opinion, members hold, in relation to the matters covered in the SIP.From 2020, trustees of defined contribution schemes will have to produce an implementation report setting out how they acted on the principles set out in the SIP in the previous year.last_img read more

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first_imgThe European Commission has officially mandated the European Financial Reporting Advisory Group (EFRAG) to develop recommendations about potential EU non-financial reporting standards, a move it flagged earlier this year.In addition, the EFRAG board president and chair of the European Lab Steering Group has been given a mandate to consider the possible need for changes to the governance and financing of EFRAG if it were entrusted with the development of such standards.The mandates were trailed in a speech by Commission executive vice president Valdis Dombrovskis in January, when he announced that the EC was going to “support a process” to develop European non-financial reporting standards.The move is in connection with the Commission’s plan for a revision of the Non-Financial Reporting Directive (NFRD), which comes as investors face new environmental, social and governance (ESG) disclosure requirements under regulations stemming from the Commission’s sustainable finance action plan. In a letter setting out EFRAG’s mandate, Dombrovsksis said the Commission had not yet taken any decision about the future role, if any, of standards in the context of the revision of the NFRD, but that “I consider it necessary to already launch technical preparatory work to allow for the swift adoption and implementation of European standards should that be the choice included in the Commission’s proposal”.“It will ultimately be for the Council and the European Parliament, as co-legislators, to decide whether the use of standards should be included in the revised NFRD and, if so, pursuant to which modalities,” he added.EFRAG’s preparatory work is to be carried out by a task force to be appointed by the steering group of the European Reporting Lab at EFRAG, with a call for candidates for this body to be issued shortly.According to the text of the mandate, the task force is to consider “the full sustainability spectrum of ESG factors in line with the overall aim of the European Green Deal and Agenda 2030”.It is also to have in mind that one of the objectives of any future EU non-financial reporting standards would be to ensure that companies subject to the revised NFRD disclose information that would allow investors to meet the requirements coming their way from “at least” the new EU taxonomy and disclosure sustainable finance regulations.Although overall supportive of the mandate, Hilde Blomme, deputy CEO of trade group AccountancyEurope and a member of the EFRAG Reporting Lab, expressed some concerns about the requirements for the composition of the task force, in particular with respect to institutional investors’ involvement.The mandate document states that the task force should as a minimum include representatives from nine stated categories of stakeholder organisations, such as non-financial corporations; financial institutions; SMEs; NGOs; and auditors, assurance providers, and accountants.Another group is “other financial market participants”, as defined by the new sustainable finance disclosures regulation, which includes asset managers, pension funds, insurers, and pan-European personal pension product providers.“What will come out of this?,” said Blomme. “Do they want one of each? We believe preparers and institutional investors are critical and although there are references to a slew of them is the balance right?“Hopefully we will see the really important institutional investors on this task force.”In its consultation on the NFRD the Commission noted that investors, companies and auditors/accountants had historically been the key stakeholder groups with an interest in and contributing to the elaboration of financial reporting standards. It asked respondents to what extent they thought these groups should also be involved in the process of developing a European non-financial reporting standard.PensionsEurope’s answer was that representatives from IORPs must be involved.The EFRAG-appointed task force is expected to complete its work in early 2021, with a progress report to be released at the end of October 2020. The Commission has indicated planning to introduce a legislative proposal for a revised NFRD in Q1 2020.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

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first_imgDanish shipping major Maersk has raised its expectations for 2019 profit based on the financials for the third quarter and the updated outlook for freight rates, volumes and bunker fuel prices for the rest of the year.The company said that its new expectation for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) is in the range of USD 5.4 to 5.8 billion, up from the previous expectation for EBITDA of around USD 5 billion. The remaining part of the guidance is unchanged.Despite slower global demand growth and lower freight rates in the third quarter of 2019, Maersk witnessed better than expected performance in Ocean driven by strong reliability and capacity management. This was combined with lower fuel prices and continued margin improvements in Terminal & Towage, which has resulted in stronger than expected financial performance in the quarter.Revenue was USD 10,055 million during the third quarter, while EBITDA reached USD 1,656 million. For the first nine-months of the year, revenue stood at USD 29,222 million and EBITDA at USD 4,249 mill.The company will detail its revised full year outlook at a later time.Following the announcement, the company’s shares jumped by more than 7% on October 21.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Nyttend [Public domain], from Wikimedia CommonsVersailles, In. — The Ripley County Coroner is looking for help to find the families of Leeann Thorpe, 50, of Morris, and Wayne C. Stewart, 63, of Versailles. Thorpe passed away June 2, 2018 and Stewart died on June 12, 2018.Any information that can help the coroner locate any family members can be left by calling 812-621-2309.last_img

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first_imgIMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,051; 2. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 979; 3. A.J. Dancer, Red Rock, Texas, 854; 4. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 754; 5. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 748; 6. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 689; 7. Mike Nichols, Harlan, Iowa, 687; 8. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, and Bryan Schutte, Wayne, Okla., both 640; 10. Gary Williams, Bonham, Texas, 630; 11. William “Joey” McCullough, Phoenix, Ariz., 593; 12. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 577; 13. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 515; 14. Gene Henrie, Cedar City, Utah, 505; 15. Jay Schmidt, Tama, Iowa, and Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, both 465; 17. Tyler Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 453; 18. Dennis Losing, Apache Junction, Ariz., 447; 19. Blake Clark, Joshua, Texas, 434; 20. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb., 431.  IMCA Late Models – 1. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 300; 2. Justin L. Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 233; 3. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, Iowa, 193; 4. Andy Nezworski, Buffalo, Iowa, 189; 5. Dylan Schmer, Aurora, Neb., 186; 6. Cory Dumpert, York, Neb., 182; 7. Lake Knutti, Chadwick, Ill., 169; 8. Dalton Simonsen, Fairfax, Iowa, 154; 9. Terry Neal, Ely, Iowa, 144; 10. Todd Malmstrom, Hampton, Ill., 139; 11. Nelson Vollbrecht, Stanton, Neb., 138; 12. Jim Johnson, Plainview, Neb., and Robert Osborne, Norfolk, Neb., both 136; 14. Chase Osborne, Battle Creek, Neb., 127; 15. Alex Humphrey, Giltner, Neb., 122; 16. Les Siebert, York, Neb., 121; 17. Matt Haase, Winside, Neb., 119; 18. Chuck Hanna, Port Byron, Ill., 108; 19. Tegan Evans, Clinton, Iowa, 105; 20. Denton Duncan, Ravenna, Neb., 102. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Tathan Burkhart, Hays, Kan., 565; 2. Cody Williams, Minneapolis, Kan., 525; 3. Kaden Reynolds, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 493; 4. Brady J. Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 484; 5. Cory Probst, Brewster, Minn., 480; 6. Leah Wroten, Independence, Iowa, 463; 7. Corey Madden, Avoca, Iowa, 461; 8. Braxton Berry, Colby, Kan., 459; 9. Dylan Nelson, Adel, Iowa, 448; 10. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 442; 11. John Watson, Des Moines, Iowa, 437; 12. Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb., 383; 13. Chuck Madden Jr., Avoca, Iowa, 382; 14. David Norquest, York, Neb., 381; 15. Nathan DeRagon, Peoria, Ariz., 376; 16. Joe Peterson, Chandler, Ariz., 370; 17. Tim Gonska, Brainerd, Minn., 365; 18. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 362; 19. Colby Kaspar, Columbus, Neb., 350; 20. Adam Ayers, Adair, Iowa, 345.  IMCA Modifieds – 1. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 908; 2. Chris Morris, Taylor, Texas, 813; 3. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 796; 4. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 777; 5. Jeffrey Hoegh, New Caney, Texas, 726; 6. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 705; 7. Jeff “Bubba” Stafford Jr., Wittmann, Ariz., 670; 8. Kevin Green, Waco, Texas, 662; 9. Chris Elliott, Abilene, Texas, 659; 10. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 634; 11. David Goode Sr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 621; 12. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 618; 13. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 583; 14. Beau Begnaud, Spring, Texas, 557; 15. Eric Tomlinson, Waco, Texas, 520; 16. Kelly Shryock, Fertile, Iowa, 500; 17. Don Banker, Austin, Texas, 495; 18. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 493; 19. Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz., 478; 20. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 470. IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Kenneth Duke, Selinsgrove, Pa., 416; 2. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, 333; 3. Zach Newlin, Millerstown, Pa., 324; 4. Andy Shouse, Oklahoma City, Okla., 303; 5. Ryan Lynn, Hollidaysburg, Pa., 300; 6. Jonathon J. Jones, Irvona, Pa., and Douglas Dodson, Middletown, Pa., both 299; 8. Kyle Ganoe, Thompsontown, Pa., 297; 9. Jacob Gomola, Seneca, Pa., 287; 10. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, 285; 11. Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, 283; 12. Larry McVay, Bordentown, N.J., 282; 13. Nick Sweigart, Myerstown, Pa., 265; 14. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, 263; 15. Dustyn Welch, Bryan, Texas, 262; 16. Jaremi Hanson, Dillsburg, Pa., 260; 17. Scott Lutz, Jonestown, Pa., 259; 18. Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., 258; 19. John Walp, Wapwallopen, Pa., 257; 20. Cale Reigle, Newport, Pa., 256.center_img Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 965; 2. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 939; 3. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 924; 4. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 682; 5. Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, 661; 6. Chris Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 518; 7. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 498; 8. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 496; 9. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 455; 10. Kaden Honeycutt, Willow Park, Texas, 437; 11. Austin Moore, Axtell, Texas, 415; 12. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 383; 13. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 378; 14. Jeff Shepperd, Waco, Texas, 369; 15. Casey Brunson, Lott, Texas, 349; 16. Garett Rawls, Elm Mott, Texas, 346; 17. Brandon Geurin, Robinson, Texas, 336; 18. Jake Upchurch, Red Oak, Texas, 334; 19. Clyde “Mike” Land, Waco, Texas, 324; 20. Jared Baird, Norman, Okla., 292. Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 980; 2. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 797; 3. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 726; 4. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 719; 5. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, 702; 6. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 662; 7. Guy Ahlwardt, Antioch, Calif., and Taylor Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., both 636; 9. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 599; 10. Justin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 578; 11. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 531; 12. Cody Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 527; 13. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif., 507; 14. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., 499; 15. Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., 485; 16. Dakota Sproul, Hays, Kan., and Brian Osantowski, Columbus, Neb., both 477; 18. Hunter Longnecker, Woodward, Iowa, 470; 19. Luke Stallbaumer, Tecumseh, Kan., and Shelby Frye, Casa Grande, Ariz., both 433.  Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Steven Bevills, Granbury, Texas, 779; 2. Terry Tritt, York, Neb., 581; 3. Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, 562; 4. Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, 558; 5. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 544; 6. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 536; 7. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 527; 8. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, and John Gill, Marshalltown, Iowa, both 459; 10. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 444; 11. Denny Berghahn Jr., Plattsmouth, Neb., 415; 12. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 405; 13. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 398; 14. Alex Dostal, Glencoe, Minn., 389; 15. Barry Taft, Argyle, Iowa, 338; 16. Shawn Hein, Beatrice, Neb., 333; 17. Ryan Whisenant, Stephenville, Texas, 328; 18. Oliver Monson, Humboldt, Iowa, 320; 19. Nathan Wahlstrom, Beatrice, Neb., 306; 20. Robert Cody, Farmington, N.M., 304.last_img read more

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