July 2019

first_imgMay 9 2018A robust research analysis has identified what factors can be targeted to support people to live as well as possible with dementia.The study, led by the University of Exeter and published in the journal Psychological Medicine, found that good relationships, social engagement, better everyday functioning, good physical and mental health, and high-quality care were all linked to better quality of life for people with dementia.Professor Linda Clare, at the University of Exeter, said: “This research supports the identification of national priorities for supporting people to live as well as possible with dementia. While many investigations focus on prevention and better treatments, it’s equally vital that we understand how we can optimize quality of life for the 50 million people worldwide who have dementia. We now need to develop ways to put these findings into action to make a difference to people’s lives by supporting relationships, social engagement and everyday functioning, addressing poor physical and mental health, and ensuring high-quality care.”The research was supported jointly by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the National for Health Research (NIHR). It involved collaboration with the London School of Economics, the universities of Sussex, Bangor, Cardiff, Brunel and New South Wales in Australia, and Kings College London.The team carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine all available evidence about the factors that are associated with quality of life for people with dementia. They included 198 studies, which incorporated data from more than 37,000 people.The study found that demographic factors such as gender, education marital status, income or age were not associated with quality of life in people with dementia. Neither was the type of dementia.Factors that are linked with poor quality of life include poor mental or physical health, difficulties such as agitation or apathy, and unmet needs.Factors that are linked with better QoL include having good relationships with family and friends, being included and involved in social activities, being able to manage everyday activities, and having religious beliefs.Many other factors showed small but statistically significant associations with quality of life. This suggests that the way in which people evaluate their quality of life is related to many aspects of their lives, each of which have a modest influence. It is likely that to some extent the aspects that are most important may be different for each person.Evidence from longitudinal studies about what predicts whether or not someone will experience a good quality of life at later stages was limited. The best indicator was the person’s initial rating of quality of life. This again highlights the importance of optimizing quality of life from the earliest stages of living with dementia.Related StoriesNew app created to help people reduce exposure to anticholinergic medicationsNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionDr Anthony Martyr, lead author on the study, from the University of Exeter, said: “While in general it is more of a challenge to maintain good quality of life as dementia progresses, we found little evidence to show what predicts whether quality of life will improve or decline over time. The IDEAL program we are currently leading will follow people living with dementia over several years and will help to answer this question.”Dr Doug Brown, Chief Policy and Research Officer at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Maintaining a healthy social life and doing things you enjoy is important for everyone’s quality of life. As this Alzheimer’s Society funded study highlights, people living with dementia are no exception.”Someone develops dementia every three minutes but too many are facing it alone and feel socially isolated- a factor that researchers pinpoint contributing to a lower quality of life.”People with dementia have a right to continue living a life they love. Alzheimer’s Society’s Dementia Friendly Communities initiative enables individuals, businesses and communities to involve and empower people affected – but we need all of society to unite to ensure people with dementia feel understood, valued and able to contribute to their community.”The full paper, entitled ‘Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia’, is published in Psychological Medicine. Authors are Anthony Martyr, Sharon M. Nelis, Catherine Quinn, Yu-Tzu Wu, Ruth A. Lamont, Catherine Henderson, Rachel Clarke, John V. Hindle, Jeanette M. Thom, Ian Rees Jones, Robin G. Morris, Jennifer M. Rusted, Christina R. Victor and Linda Clare.The study stems from the IDEAL program. IDEAL is a major longitudinal cohort study of 1550 people with dementia and their family members or friends funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research. The IDEAL study is survey- and interview-based and aims to understand what makes it easier or more difficult for people to live well with dementia. The findings from the study will help to identify what can be done by individuals, communities, health and social care practitioners, care providers and policy-makers to improve the likelihood of living well with dementia. Since 2018 the project has been extended as an Alzheimer’s Society Centre of Excellence, making it possible to follow the experiences of participants for several more years. Source:http://www.exeter.ac.uk/last_img read more

first_imgJun 6 2018Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) will provide $45 million to Rush University Medical Center to substantially grow its Road Home Program, allowing an expected 5,000 military veterans or their family members to receive mental health care services without cost to them over the next five years.The grant, the largest single donation to Rush since its founding in 1837, will expand a WWP-funded program that provides three weeks of concentrated post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment that has been proven to significantly reduce PTSD symptoms.”This is a transformational commitment from Wounded Warrior Project that will expand assistance to many more veterans and their families who so badly need and richly deserve these services,” said Dr. Larry Goodman, CEO of Rush University Medical Center and the Rush System. “We are honored by this extraordinary commitment and the trust it shows in Rush and the Road Home Program. “Intensive Outpatient Program found to relieve PTSDThe Road Home Program at Rush was launched in 2014 to help military veterans and their families make healthier transitions to civilian life by offering specialized mental health care, regardless of the ability to pay. In 2016, WWP, Rush, Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and UCLA Health in Los Angeles collaborated to create Warrior Care Network, a national care network that provides comprehensive mental health care to veterans living with PTSD, traumatic brain injury, and other related conditions.As part of that effort, WWP provided a $15M grant for Rush to help support its treatment programs, including development of a three week long Intensive Outpatient Program. In the IOP, as it’s known for short, groups of eight to 12 veterans from across the country whose PTSD is not responding to standard treatment receive more than 100 hours of treatment, which includes cognitive processing therapy and wellness interventions such as mindfulness, yoga, art therapy and acupuncture.More than 260 veterans have completed IOP therapy to date, and Rush researchers have documented rapid and clinically meaningful reductions in PTSD and depression symptoms for the great majority of them.WWP grant also will support other services for veterans and their familiesThe new funding announced today will make the IOP available to more than 1,500 veterans over the next five years. In addition to the IOP expansion, the new funding also will enable Road Home Program clinicians and therapists to provide outpatient therapy, counseling and other services to an additional 3,500 veterans and their family members from the Chicago area and elsewhere. Because spouses, children and other family members suffer as well when their loved one suffers from a trauma-based mental health issue, RHP provides free services to family members as well.”The Road Home Program at Rush has proven to be just that – a road home for thousands of men and women wounded while serving their country,” said WWP CEO Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Mike Linnington. “Wounded Warrior Project has increasingly focused on improving the mental health and wellness of our veterans. Invisible wounds are as debilitating as physical injuries, with care like that provided at Road Home, can be largely overcome.”Related StoriesGender biases are extremely common among health care professionalsIU-connected startup working to enable precision medicine for mental health issues, chronic painEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsExpanded services will meet growing needAs many as one in three veterans who served in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have returned to the United States with what are called the “invisible wounds of war,” including PTSD, traumatic brain injury, and related mental health conditions associated with their military service.”It is critical that the general health care system step up to do its share to care for our servicemen and women, and their families, who have given so much for our country. This support and generosity from Wounded Warrior Project is enabling us at Rush to provide the cutting-edge care and services that our warriors and their families so dearly earned,” said Dr. Mark Pollack, professor and chairperson of the Rush Department of Psychiatry and founding director of the Road Home Program.The Road Home Program operates in a spirit of collaboration, connecting veterans to social services, education and vocational programming via local organizations. The center complements the many other important psychiatric and outreach services to veterans already offered by local Veterans Administration medical centers Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital; Jesse Brown VA Medical Center; and Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center.The care, provided at no cost to the veteran and his or her family, helps fill in the gaps in mental health care currently not provided by VA or to those veterans who are not eligible or prefer to not receive care through the VA. Rush coordinates continuing care with the VA, working with a VA liaison so the veterans can continue to get treatment inside or outside of VA.More than 1,000 people have received care from the Road Home Program since it was established to help military veterans and their families make healthier transitions to civilian life by offering specialized mental health care, peer-to-peer outreach, counseling and community resource navigation. This care includes evidence-based treatment for PTSD, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma; child and family counseling; service and re­source navigation; peer-to-peer outreach; public awareness programming; and train­ing for primary care physicians and others.The WWP grant brings the total dollar amount of gifts made to Rush for the current fiscal year to nearly $86 million overall, making fiscal year 2018 the most successful year for fundraising in Rush’s history. The previous record for donations in a single year was $75.2 million in 2005. The past two largest gifts made to Rush were $20 million each.Source: https://www.rush.edu/news/press-releases/45-million-grant-expands-veterans-serviceslast_img read more

first_imgJun 11 2018The WHO Regional Director for Africa, Dr Matshidiso Moet has called on African countries to strengthen national blood services to enhance universal access to safe blood. In her message to commemorate World Blood Donor Day which falls on 14 June 2018, under the theme: Be there for someone else. Give blood. Share life, the Regional Director noted that although countries have made significant progress to improve the availability and safety of blood, the demand for blood transfusion is increasing.Related StoriesBlood based test using AI and nanotechnology devised for chronic fatigue syndromeDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustScientists turn type A blood into universal type O, potentially doubling blood transfusion stocks“Adequate supplies of safe blood can only be assured through regular, voluntary, unpaid donations. I urge countries to support voluntary blood donations as a solidarity act for all, and to ensure that national blood services have sustainable funding for blood safety programmes,” she said.Dr Moeti drew attention to the kind gestures of regular and voluntary blood donors for patients in need, and encouraged people to care for one another by donating blood. “The day is also an opportunity to thank voluntary, unpaid blood donors for their life-saving gifts of blood and to motivate people in good health who have never given blood to begin doing so, particularly young people,” she added.Blood transfusion saves lives. It helps patients suffering from life-threatening conditions to live longer, better quality lives, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures. It has an essential, life-saving role in maternal and child care and during the emergency responses to disasters, as well as in road traffic accidents and injuries. Safe blood donations play a vital role in providing effective and prompt care for patients in need. This is how ordinary people can be there for someone else – by giving blood and sharing life. Source:http://www.afro.who.int/last_img read more

first_img Source:http://www.rupress.org/ Jun 19 2018Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.Mammary glands contain two types of cells, basal and luminal, that arise from specialized stem or progenitor cells. During pregnancy or the menstrual cycle, progesterone induces basal and luminal progenitor cell numbers to expand and drive mammary gland formation. But mammary gland progenitors may also give rise to cancer. Progesterone exposure and stem cell proliferation have been linked to the development of breast cancer, and the number of progenitor cells is often elevated in women carrying mutations in BRCA1 or other genes that put them at a high risk of developing the disease.”Currently, there are no standard of care preventative interventions for women at high risk of breast cancer,” says Dr. Rama Khokha, a Senior Scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Professor of Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. “Although it is becoming increasingly clear that stem and progenitor cells underlie cancer development, we lack strategies to target these cells for chemoprevention.”To learn more about these progenitor cells and identify any vulnerabilities that could potentially be exploited to prevent the development of breast cancer, Khokha and colleagues isolated cells from the mammary glands of mice and examined how they changed in response to progesterone. The researchers had previously measured all of the RNA molecules produced by mammary gland cells. Now they quantified all of the cells’ proteins and assessed the cells’ epigenomes-;the various chemical modifications to a cell’s chromosomes that help determine which genes are turned on and off.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerThis global overview of mammary gland cells revealed that in response to progesterone, progenitor cells-;particularly luminal progenitor cells-;up-regulate many of the epigenetic regulatory proteins responsible for modifying the cells’ chromosomes.”We thought that drugs that inhibit these epigenetic regulatory proteins might suppress the proliferation of stem and progenitor cells in response to progesterone,” Khokha says.The researchers tested multiple epigenetic inhibitors, many of which are already approved for use in humans by the FDA. Several of these drugs inhibited the proliferation of mammary gland progenitor cells and decreased their total number in mice. One, a drug called decitabine that inhibits DNA methyltransferase enzymes and is approved to treat myelodysplastic syndrome, delayed the formation of tumors in breast cancer–prone rodents.Khokha and colleagues then tested the effects of epigenetic inhibitors on mammary gland progenitor cells isolated from women at high risk of developing breast cancer. Progenitor cells from patients with BRCA1 mutations were particularly vulnerable to epigenetic inhibitors, including decitabine. Decitabine also suppressed the activity of progenitor cells from patients with mutations in the BRCA2 gene.”This demonstrates that the dependency of progenitor cells on specific epigenetic proteins is conserved between mice and humans and highlights the potential of epigenetic therapies to target these important cell types in the human breast as a form of chemoprevention,” says Khokha.last_img read more

first_imgJul 17 2018An international team of scientists led by Helmholtz Zentrum München and University of Copenhagen has presented the largest study so far on allergic rhinitis in the journal ‘Nature Genetics’. The data of nearly 900,000 participants revealed loci in the human genome whose changes significantly increase the risk of disease.Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, is the most common form of allergy. It is triggered by airborne allergens, including pollens, house dust mite and animal dander. Around 400 million people worldwide are affected by the disease, and the trend is rising, especially in westernized countries.”In order to improve the prevention and treatment of this disease, we first need to understand why the body defends itself against certain, actually harmless substances,” said Dr. Marie Standl, head of a research group at the Institute of Epidemiology at Helmholtz Zentrum München. She is the first author of the current study and significantly involved in the elaborate statistical evaluation of the data of nearly 900,000 test persons.Dragnet search for risk genesThe aim of the study, which was performed within the framework of the EAGLE (EArly Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology) consortium, was to identify genetic differences between people with and without allergic rhinitis. For this purpose, the researchers performed a dragnet search for the respective risk genes and sequentially narrowed down the number of candidate genes: In a first step, they compared the genome of around 60,000 patients with allergic rhinitis with that of over 150,000 healthy controls, revealing a pool of 42 significant risk genes, some of which had previously been described in the literature.Related StoriesNew gene-editing protocol allows perfect mutation-effect matchingAnorexia may be as much a metabolic disorder as it is a psychiatric one, say scientistsEMBL study reveals uncoupling between chromatin topology and gene expressionIn a second step, 20 so far unknown risk genes could be confirmed on the basis of data from another 60,000 patients and 620,000 healthy controls. “The higher the number of study participants, the more reliable conclusions we can draw,” said Standl, explaining the importance of the large amount of data. “The identified risk genes can explain about eight percent of all cases of allergic rhinitis.”The authors then used databases to investigate which functions could be assigned to these genes. In fact, most of these were known to have an association with the immune system, for example in the binding of antigens. In addition, a strong overlap of risk genes for allergic rhinitis and autoimmune diseases was observed.”The risk loci we have identified can help understanding the mechanisms causing allergic rhinitis and hopefully also to find targets for treatment and prevention” said Dr. Klaus Bønnelykke, who directed the study together with co-authors Johannes Waage and Hans Bisgaard from COPSAC (Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood), University of Copenhagen. “Still, the genes we identified only partly explain why so many people develop allergic rhinitis. One important next step is to understand how risk genes interact with our environment.” Source:https://www.helmholtz-muenchen.de/en/news/latest-news/press-information-news/article/44736/index.htmllast_img read more

When it comes to academic achievement, Asian-Americans outclass every other ethnic group, with more than half over age 25 holding a bachelor’s degree—well above the national average of 28%. To find what gives Asian-Americans a leg up, a team of sociologists scoured two long-term surveys covering more than 5000 U.S. Asian and white students. After crunching test scores, GPAs, teacher evaluations, and social factors such as immigration status, the team reports a simple explanation online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: Asian-American students work harder. The team found that students from all Asian ethnic groups put greater importance on effort than on natural ability. This outlook, the team argues, causes students to respond to challenges by trying harder and has a greater impact on Asian-Americans’ academic achievement than does cognitive ability or socioeconomic status. However, the team says Asian-American students reported lower self-esteem, more conflict with their parents, and less time spent with friends compared with their white peers. The team suspects the high academic expectations or their “outsider” status in American society could be to blame.See more ScienceShots. read more

first_imgSAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA—Fifteen-year-old Wesley Wolf’s foray into scientific research began 2 years ago with a simple question: Does the type of litter my cats use affect how many bacteria they traipse around the house? Wolf, then a 7th-grader in Georgetown, Ohio, asked his mom, a veterinarian, if he could run an experiment with some of the animals in her clinic. With the permission of their owners, he placed three different kinds of litter into the cages of 30 cats: clay litter, clumping litter, and torn-up newspaper. Then, after 24 and 48 hours, Wolf pressed a paw from each cat onto a petri dish filled with nutrients and waited to see what grew. The type of litter didn’t make a difference, he reported in a poster presentation here today at the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science); all cats harbored about the same number of bacteria on their paws. (Wolf says he wasn’t able to assess their virulence.) “So if owners are worried about which litter to use, they should just go with what’s cheapest or most convenient,” he says. Wolf’s finding may not seem like a revelation, but it has impressed judges nationwide. His was only one of 139 student posters selected from state competitions to appear at the meeting, as part of the American Junior Academy of Sciences. The work has inspired him to pursue a Ph.D. in microbiology after he graduates high school. As for the appeal of his kitty litter study, he chalks some of it up to the relatively rigorous science—and the rest to his chosen test subject: “Cats are a common pet, so it’s relevant to many peoples’ lives.”Check out our full coverage of the AAAS annual meeting.What message would you send into space? Tell us on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!last_img read more

first_imgThe National Science Foundation (NSF) got some pushback today on its plan to require universities to pay 10% of the salaries of faculty members working temporarily at the agency.The negative feedback came from NSF’s oversight body, the National Science Board, whose executive committee last month gave NSF officials a green light to test the policy over the next 12 months with a new crop of so-called rotators. Board member Arthur Bienenstock of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, said the cost sharing could make it harder for NSF to attract talented scientists if universities feel financially squeezed by the requirement. The current NSF policy encourages institutions to pay up to 15% of the faculty member’s salary who is on leave. But NSF collects an average of only 5%, and many universities pay nothing.“I’m concerned about the pilot,” said Bienenstock during a session of the board’s Committee on Audit and Oversight. “I think it’s likely to hurt the [quality of the] applicant pool.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Bienenstock proposed that NSF delay its pilot until it has completed its overview of all agency staffing practices, an exercise due to be finished by the end of the year. But other board members said they saw no reason to wait.“The current policy is not workable,” said John Anderson, past president of the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, who chairs the audit committee. “I think 10% is very reasonable, and I see no problem implementing it now. As a former university president, I can’t believe that I would deny a request from someone to go to NSF.”Several board members also noted the value to a university of having a returning faculty member share with colleagues their knowledge of the workings of NSF and the federal government. “They are being cherry picked by other universities because of their added knowledge,” noted one member about academics who participate in the IPA program, whose name stems from a 1970 law called the Intergovernmental Personnel Act.NSF’s Joanne Tornow in Arlington, Virginia, who chairs the internal steering committee that is reviewing the program, noted that many universities will actually save money under the new arrangement. “There are 110 institutions who sent IPAs to NSF in 2016, and 42 of them will pay less under the pilot,” she told the board. “And about two-thirds of them are public institutions,” she added, responding to a comment about the large budget cuts in recent years to flagship state universities.NSF expects the pilot to affect 50 to 60 rotators over the next year. In 2016 NSF hosted 177 IPAs, 29 in senior management positions and 148 working as program officers, at a total cost of $49 million.last_img read more

first_img New York City area could soon see massive floods every 5 years By Randall HymanOct. 23, 2017 , 3:00 PM Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen/U.S. Air Force/New Jersey National Guard/Wikimedia Commons center_img This year’s Atlantic hurricane season was off the charts by nearly every measure, and new climate modeling suggests that New York City may be headed for weather that could make superstorm Sandy look routine. Flooding from hurricanes will intensify with sea level rise, and what was—in preindustrial times—a once-in-500-years flood may occur once every 5 years by 2030 scientists report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers used sediment cores from along the New Jersey shore to reconstruct flood events from 850 C.E. to modern times. Until 1800, flooding of 2.25 meters above sea level, slightly below Sandy’s 2.8-meter surge, took place on average once every 500 years. From 1970 to 2005, floods of that height had a probability of occurring once every 25 years. To project that trend forward, the team then used models recently developed to analyze Antarctic ice sheet collapse, plus large global data sets to tailor specific Atlantic tropical cyclone data and create “synthetic” storms to simulate future weather patterns. When combined with projected sea level rise, flooding of 2.25 meters—enough to do tens of billions of dollars of damage—could take place every 5 years from 2030 to 2045. And the definition of a once-in-500-years event will change as well, reaching as high as 5.1 meters by the end of this century and as high as 15.4 meters by the year 2300—enough to cover most of LaGuardia airport and all of Liberty Island. Of course, those numbers are the product of many assumptions, including partial collapse of the Antarctic ice sheet, and they are less reliable the further out they go. But if there’s any good news, it’s that the new study also indicates that future climate dynamics may drive Atlantic hurricanes farther offshore, potentially preventing the deadly compounding of sea level rise with storm surge increases, and possibly sparing New York City fewer Sandy-style direct hits.last_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Kelly ServickFeb. 21, 2019 , 11:00 AM Blocking CCR5 boosted neural projections from the brain’s motor region (left). MARY TEENA JOY HIV drug could improve recovery after strokecenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Stroke treatment has been a race against time. In the hours after a stroke, the clot-busting treatment tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) can limit damage to the brain. But once that damage is done, no drugs are known to promote recovery. New research suggests such a therapy could come from an unlikely target: a cellular protein called CCR5 that allows HIV to infect cells. Scientists found that in mice, disabling CCR5 helps surviving neurons make new connections, and that people who carry a CCR5 mutation may recover better from a stroke.”This is the first real molecular target to improve recovery after stroke,” says Argye Hillis, a stroke neurologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, who was not involved in the work. A clinical trial will soon test its promise by giving stroke patients an HIV drug that blocks CCR5.White blood cells display CCR5 on their surface to intercept signals from molecules called chemokines and coordinate an immune response. But HIV exploits CCR5, grabbing onto it to invade host cells. People with a mutation that cripples the CCR5 gene are protected from infection, which is why Chinese scientist He Jiankui recently aimed to mutate CCR5 in controversial human experiments. The new discoveries about CCR5 began with a hunt for “smart mice”—animals bearing genetic mutations that apparently boost their ability to learn and remember. Neuroscientist Alcino Silva and his team at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), wanted to figure out which of 148 mouse strains had such enhancements. In 2016, they reported that reducing levels of CCR5 in a healthy mouse brain enhanced memory formation and learning.UCLA stroke neurologist Thomas Carmichael was intrigued. “When you watch patients recover in stroke, it looks like they’re relearning to walk or relearning language,” he says. Indeed, surviving neurons near the injury sprout tendrils to make new contacts across the brain. A drug that targets CCR5 seemed promising for stroke recovery, and that drug was already on hand. Maraviroc, which blocks CCR5, was approved by U.S. regulators in 2007 for use with other antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV infections.In Cell this week, Silva, Carmichael, and their collaborators showed that CCR5 levels in mouse neurons skyrocket after stroke and can remain elevated for weeks—and that the protein appears to hamper recovery. The team blocked CCR5 with maraviroc or a gene that interferes with its production, and then ran the mice through tests of motor ability—for example, counting how many times their feet slipped as they walked across a metal grid. Treated mice showed greater motor improvements than controls at the end of the 9-week testing period.Even if the researchers waited until 3 weeks after a stroke to give the animals maraviroc, it improved their performance. In previous studies, nothing has seemed to help at that point, says Dale Corbett, a neuroscientist specializing in stroke recovery at the University of Ottawa. The new results, he says, suggest “it may be feasible to reopen this recovery window in people.”Blocking CCR5 seemed to help maintain connections between neurons adjacent to the injured site. And it caused neurons in motor regions to sprout more projections to the opposite side of the brain, a process that might help a mouse relearn lost movements.What CCR5 does in the poststroke brain is hazy. Surging CCR5 is part of the inflammatory response to stroke, says Robyn Klein, a neuroimmunologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. In flammatory molecules may prompt neurons to express more of this chemokine receptor. In the developing brain, chemokines are known to influence how neurons migrate and connect. After stroke, they seem to decrease the number of connection sites on neurons near the damage. (How that process hinders regrowth and recovery isn’t clear.)Carmichael notes that blocking CCR5 also caused neurons to express genes that increase their excitability, making them fire more readily. He suspects that neurons boost CCR5 after a stroke to dampen their activity and lie low to avoid a deadly cellular frenzy known as excitotoxicity. But because the protein then sticks around, that protective mechanism gets in the way of recovery.Mouse results often prove meaningless in people, but when Carmichael’s group teamed up with researchers behind the Tel Aviv Brain Acute Stroke Cohort (TABASCO) in Israel, they found encouraging clues. Roughly 10% of Europeans have a genetic deletion that cripples CCR5, and the number is higher in Jewish people of Eastern European origin. The TABASCO team identified 68 people in its cohort of stroke survivors who had at least one copy of the CCR5 mutation. Compared with people without the mutation, they performed slightly better on tests of motor and sensory skills and cognitive abilities both 6 months and 1 year after a stroke, the new study found.”It wasn’t gangbusters better, but … the fact that they found anything is impressive,” says Steven Cramer, a stroke neurologist at UC Irvine, who has studied genes linked to stroke recovery.Carmichael and his collaborators are now designing a clinical trial that will give 30 people maraviroc starting when they leave an inpatient rehabilitation facility—typically about 4 weeks after a stroke. The team hopes to launch the trial this year.Meanwhile, some researchers expect the CCR5 story to inspire a broader search for brain repair strategies based on learning and memory genes. “We’ve always been talking about having a tPA-like moment for stroke recovery,” Corbett says. “Whether this is it or not, I don’t know, but at least it gives us hope.” Emaillast_img read more

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The high-profile patent fight over who invented a key feature of the genome editor CRISPR has been resurrected. The 3-year-old battle, which a U.S. appeals court appeared to have put to rest in September 2018, pits parties represented by the University of California (UC) against the Broad Institute of Cambridge, Massachusetts. It revolves around the use of CRISPR, originally derived from a DNA-cutting system used by bacteria, in the more complex cells of eukaryotes, which includes humans, making the contested patents key to the potentially lucrative development of novel medicines. After the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office awarded the Broad Institute several patents for the invention of CRISPR in eukaryotes, UC requested what’s known as an interference based on its own submitted patent. The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) ruled against UC in February 2017, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit denied UC’s appeal 1 year later.Now, based on new claims—the parts of a patent that dive into the specifics—by UC in April 2018, PTAB has ruled there is a potential interference that needs to be examined. Eldora Ellison, a lead attorney for the UC team who works at Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox in Washington, D.C., says PTAB ruled in 2017 there was no interference because the UC patent involved far-reaching claims of the CRISPR invention for many systems and the Broad Institute focused only on eukaryotes “What they said is, ‘We’re actually not going to have a fight at this point in time, because we think that these are two different inventions,’” Ellison says. “They kind of kicked the can down the road on who was first to invent the use of CRISPR in eukaryotes.”But UC’s new focused claims led PTAB to declare an interference on 24 June. Surprise patent ruling revives high-stakes dispute over the genome editor CRISPR Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jon CohenJun. 26, 2019 , 1:45 PMcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Dana Verkouteren A University of California attorney addresses three judges presiding over the CRISPR patent hearing. The UC team, which represents Jennifer Doudna from UC Berkeley and her collaborators, first published the use of CRISPR as a genome-editing tool in June 2012, but it did not demonstrate that it worked in eukaryotic cells. Broad’s team, led by Feng Zhang, published a paper that described its success in eukaryotes in January 2013. (Both papers were published in Science.) In the earlier rounds, UC and Broad squared off over the question of whether it was “obvious” after the Doudna group published its 2012 paper that CRISPR would work in eukaryotes and that researchers skilled in the art would have a “reasonable expectation of success” if they tried their hands at the experiment. “The Broad likes to act like the earlier decision was some kind of a ruling about the sufficiency of UC’s patent applications disclosure. And that’s not the case. It’s just a comparison of the claims,” Ellison says.The Broad Institute, unsurprisingly, does not see eye to eye with this interpretation. In a statement, it says PTAB’s new interference “challenges the validity of [UC’s] eukaryotic claims.” The Broad group has been deemed the “senior party,” the statement notes, which means UC “carries the burden of proof” and must convince PTAB that the Broad team did not invent the eukaryotic use of CRISPR.“We welcome this action by the PTAB,” the statement says. “Broad Institute looks forward to participating in the interference process.”Catherine Coombes, a patent attorney at HGF in York, U.K., who does not represent Broad or UC but is involved in CRISPR patents, says the new interference “adds to the complexity of the landscape.” The European Patent Office has granted “overlapping rights” to both groups and others who have filed CRISPR patent applications, anticipating that legal fights will occur later. “For human therapeutics, it is still too early to know where the key patents will lie,” Coombes says, noting that different enzymes used in various CRISPR systems ultimately may make one invention safer or more effective than another.Ultimately, the patent uncertainty created by the new interference declaration may prod UC and Broad to cut a deal. “Given the complexity of the landscape, and as the thicketing of the landscape continues, the desire to get some form of collaboration for licensing only enhances for third parties,” Coombes says. Broad says it long has hoped UC would enter a “patent pool” to resolve the dispute, which effectively would allow both parties to earn money from their inventions without becoming ensnarled in legal wrangling with each other. Ellison would not say whether the interference would increase pressure on UC and the Broad Institute to arrive at this type of settlement but called it a “great question.”The parties will first discuss the interference on 5 August in a conference call with PTAB. If the parties do not reach a settlement, the hearing is expected in about 8 months.last_img read more

first_imgHannah Payne is the trigger happy vigilante who brutally shot and killed Kenneth Herring after she witnessed a hit and run in Clayton County, Georgia. Although he posed no threat to her and she was reportedly heard on a 911 call saying she would shoot him, Payne will reportedly be released on bond. READ MORE: Hannah Payne’s Murder Case For Killing Kenneth Herring Moves Forward11 Alive reports, “Conditions of her bond, set at $100,000, include requirements that she wear an ankle monitor and stay away from the other principles involved in the case.” She also isn’t allowed to have a gun but she clearly shouldn’t be allowed on the streets. USA, New York, Protesters of police killing march in New York demanding Justice For All Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ More By NewsOne Staff Christine Herring, Kenneth Herring’s wife, said outside of the courthouse, “She shouldn’t have  got a bond, I know that.” Watch below:What makes the bond even more disturbing is wow there are more details suggesting why Herring drove off after hitting another car — he may have been in the middle of a medical emergency. During the preliminary court hearing Tuesday morning, an eye witness said Herring was “probably like diabetic shock” after he left the scene of the hit and run.His wife said that was precisely the case outside of the courtroom, “I know he was having a diabetic episode because he don’t just run off the scene,” Christine Herring said outside of the courtroom. “I knew he was trying to get to the hospital.”On the afternoon of May 7, Payne allegedly witnessed a minor hit and run accident in Georgia. Herring supposedly hit a tractor trailer and drove off. That allegedly prompted Payne, who was legally carrying her concealed gun, to drive after Herring for about a mile, catch up to him, block his car with hers, get out of her car and engage in a struggle with him.center_img Clayton County , Clayton County Courthouse , Clayton County Police Department , Georgia , Hannah Payne , Kenneth Herring Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist 31 Black Women Who Died In Police Custody Clayton County Police Detective Keon Hayward testified that Payne called 911 and could be heard saying to Herring, “Get out of the car, get out of the car, get out of the f****** car… I’m going to shoot you.”The 21-year-old reportedly shot the 62-year-old but told the 911 operator, “He just shot himself with my gun.”Payne’s defense attorney argued that her actions were in self-defense and that she received “mixed communication” from the 911 operator. There was a motion to dismiss the charges, which Judge William H. West denied.The apparent vigilante killing is reminiscent of the murder charges faced by George Zimmerman, the Florida neighborhood watch volunteer who stalked and killed Trayvon Martin after police advised him against approaching the unarmed teenager in 2014.We hope the Herring family gets justice.SEE ALSO:Watch A Black Man Save His Life While A White Cop Has A Gun In His FaceOne Step Forward, 10 Steps Back: San Francisco’s First Black Woman Mayor Unseated By Rich White ManMeek Mill Accuses Las Vegas Hotel Of ‘Going To Extreme Racist Levels’ And Threatens to Suelast_img read more

first_imgSome 1,100 miles north-east of New Guinea lies an atoll, gently tucked in by the Pacific Ocean and more or less secluded from the rest of the world. It’s called Truk (or Chuuk) Lagoon, part of the Pacific archipelago-state of Micronesia. Truk Lagoon was first sighted by a Spanish expedition in 1528. At the time, the lagoon was home to several indigenous tribes who lived in total isolation.Centuries passed and Spain, the initial “owner” of Truk Lagoon lost its position in the Pacific after the Spanish-American War of 1898. The Spaniards were forced to sell the entire atoll to the Germans the following year. Once again, in the aftermath of the First World War, the lagoon changed hands, becoming the property of Japan.By World War II the Japanese had established a port and a naval stronghold, which was manned by a total of 40,000 soldiers. The atoll itself includes a natural harbor enclosed within a protective reef, making it ideal for strategic purposes.Chuuk State is one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia.This was one of the main reasons why the Empire of Japan decided to use the lagoon as a base for operations in the Pacific. The surrounding islands were installed with roads, trenches, and most importantly coastal gun batteries and mortar emplacements.This was a preliminary protective ring for the atoll which at one point held the majority of the Japanese fleet. Some of its biggest and most important assets, including the largest battleships ever built ― the Imperial Japanese Navy’s Yamato and her sister ship Musashi — were moored here.Japanese military infrastructure at Truk Lagoon included five airstrips, seaplane bases, a torpedo boat station, submarine repair shops, a communications center and a radar station. It was the largest Japanese forward naval base, comparable in size and significance to Pearl Harbor.Valve wheels inside the engine room of sunken Japanese ship Kiyosumi Maru. The ship was sunk in Truck Lagoon on February 16, 1944, by the U.S. Navy during Operation Hailstorm.Ironically in 1944, it suffered a fate similar to that of the infamous U.S. military port attack which marked the beginning of American involvement in WWII. Following a large-scale naval aerial assault, the Japanese lost a portion of their fleet at Truk Lagoon, rendering it useless for further strategic operations.Despite managing to evacuate their heavy cruisers and aircraft carriers just in time to avoid the slaughter which took place on February 17, 1944, and lasted for three consecutive days, the Japanese Imperial Navy was never able to fully recover from the blow.Lanterns stored in a locker in the forward section of the wreck of the Kiyosumi Maru. Sunk in 1944 in Truk Lagoon during the U.S. Navy operation Hailstorm.The death toll was high ― 12 small light cruisers, destroyers, and auxiliaries, together with 32 merchant ships that happened to be stationed at the Truk Lagoon. Along with the ships, around 275 Japanese aircraft were shot down. Together with the ships and the aircraft, some 4,500 men lost their lives during the raids which were designated as Operation Hailstone.The legend of the ‘Lake Michigan Triangle’In 1969, French oceanographer and filmmaker Jacques Cousteau followed the trail of the once mighty fleet stationed in the Truk Lagoon and discovered a huge graveyard of ships and equipment which laid untouched on the seabed since the day of the attack. This led to the production of an episode within Cousteau’s documentary series, titled The Lagoon of Lost Ships.Bow gun of the Fujikawa Maru. Photo by Aquaimages CC BY-SA 2.5Together with ships, downed aircraft and even tanks, French divers found a great number of human bones resting on the bottom of the lagoon. An eerie sight reminded the surprised visitors that this was once indeed a place of fierce battle.Cousteau’s discovery sparked huge interest among other diving clubs, adventurers, and explorers, but it also attracted the attention of the Japanese government, who launched an operation to excavate the bodies of their fallen sailors, soldiers and pilots in an effort to provide them a proper burial. In the meantime, the whole site has been classified as a Japanese war grave.San Francisco MaruIn The Lagoon of Lost Ships Jacques Cousteau observes the wreckage on the seabed, as he poetically narrates the documentary’s ending:“Truk Lagoon presents a mysterious planet of life and death. On the one hand, nature absorbs the artifacts of war. And on the other, she has preserved them. Only centuries from now, will every trace of man’s follies vanish from the bottom of Truk Lagoon.”So many intact ships lay scattered in such close proximity attracts divers from all over the world. Since the days of the battle, the ships, along with other equipment have remained more or less in the same position in which they sank. Wrecks that are up to 50 feet deep can be seen from the surface, as the water in these parts is extremely clear.Female diver explores a car from the 1940s in one of the holds on the wreck of the Hoki Maru, Truk Lagoon. The shipwreck is a very popular dive for experienced divers.On one of them, traces of a torpedo impact can be seen clearly. Another, identified as the medium coastal freighter Gosei Maru has a huge hole on its deck, indicating that an aerial bomb was dropped directly above it.The identification of ships in the Truk Lagoon has become an obsession for many enthusiasts who stop at nothing when it comes to detective work and history. Other relics like motorcycles, radios, weapons, spare parts, and railroad cars can still be found at the bottom. Diving expeditions are now a common activity in the lagoon.Saki Bottles on Ship WreckIn 1972, the lagoon was recognized as a historical site and designated as the Truk Lagoon National Monument. This was an important step for protecting the lagoon from looters and raiders, but consequently, it also raised awareness on the effect the wreckages have on the environment.Read another story from us: Court rules a 1565 wreck off the Florida coast belongs to France, not salvage companyFuel and oil which went down with the ships have been polluting the lagoon for decades. In 2011, an oil spill presumably coming from one of several Japanese tankers sunk in 1944 occurred, endangering the diverse array of marine life which resides in the wrecks.Environmentalists claim that it is an urgent issue which, if not dealt with, could cause further harm to both the site and its current inhabitants like manta rays, turtles, sharks, and corals.Nikola Budanovic is a freelance journalist who has worked for various media outlets such as Vice, War History Online, The Vintage News, and Taste of Cinema. His main areas of interest are history, particularly military history, literature and film.last_img read more

first_img Advertising “Both monetary and fiscal stimulus are needed to reduce unemployment and revive inflation. But businesses also need to respond through increased investment.”Wednesday’s data means GDP will have to pick up remarkably in the current quarter to achieve the Reserve Bank of Australia’s (RBA) downgraded forecast of 1.7% for the 12-months to June 30.Worried about a slowing economy, rising unemployment and lukewarm inflation the country’s central bank on Tuesday cut rates to an all-time low 1.25% on Tuesday, marking its first easing in nearly three years.Rates futures imply a 50-50 chance of another cut to 1.00% next month. A majority of 44 economists polled by Reuters predict a second cut in August with some also expecting a third move. Australian model avoids US prison sentence after fracas on international flight Gross domestic product (GDP) figures on Wednesday showed the A$1.9 trillion ($1.3 trillion) economy grew 0.4% in the three months ended March, double the 0.2% clocked in the fourth quarter but below expectations for a 0.5% increase.However, the 1.8% annual expansion fell far short of the long-term average of 3.5% and was the weakest since the global financial crisis.“The Aussie economy has lost momentum. And soft consumer spending is the main culprit,” said CommSec chief economist Craig James. By Reuters |Sydney | Published: June 5, 2019 12:31:09 pm Best Of Express P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Chandrayaan-2 launch on July 22 at 2.43 pm: ISRO Advertising Australian govt seeks information about man detained in North Korea More Explained Related News Advertising Australia's GDP growth hits decade low, stimulus needed to avoid recession Wednesday’s data means GDP will have to pick up remarkably in the current quarter to achieve the Reserve Bank of Australia’s (RBA) downgraded forecast of 1.7% for the 12-months to June 30.Australia’s economic growth slowed to a decade low last quarter, underlining the need for aggressive monetary and fiscal stimulus to stop the resource-rich nation from sliding into recession after 28 straight years of expansion. 0 Comment(s) Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Taking stock of monsoon rain Australian student missing in North Korea is released Also helping growth is an export bonanza thanks to high prices for some of Australia’s resources. That helped nominal GDP expand at a solid 4.9% pace for the year, even though domestic inflation remained very subdued.Indeed, the main measure of domestic prices slowed to 1.4% for the year, well below the RBA’s target band of 2-3%. In a bid to revive growth, Australian authorities have already taken some measures, including easing lending standards for mortgage borrowers, tax rebates for millions of households and a 3% increase in minimum wage for low-income earners. Still, “the risk is that Governor Lowe will need to take policy below 1.00% before mid-2020 to meet the RBA’s central economic labour market and underlying inflation forecasts,” Citi economist Josh Williamson said. In a speech late on Tuesday, RBA Governor Philip Lowe said it was “not unreasonable” to expect a lower cash rate from here, signalling the door was wide open for further easing.STARK DIVIDEA major setback in Wednesday’s data came from private consumption, which contributed just 0.1% to overall growth. The consumer sector accounts for about 56% of Australia’s GDP. A decline in Sydney and Melbourne home prices has eaten into consumer wealth at a time when the household debt to income ratio is at a record high. A long stretch of unusually slow wages growth has also throttled household incomes, further hitting demand.Output per person has been struggling badly in this latest slowdown, which began in mid-2018, inching up a paltry 0.1% for the year. One bright spot in the quarter was higher government spending on disability, health and aged care services.“Notably, there is a stark divide between private demand and public demand,” Westpac economist Andrew Hanlan said in a note.“Public demand is a source of strength.”last_img read more

first_imgBy Express News Service |New Delhi | Updated: July 10, 2019 2:43:20 am Related News narendra modi, mahatma gandhi, mahatma gandhi birth anniversary, padayatra, vallabhbhai patel, pm modi, bjp, budget, nirmala sitharaman, indian express news Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Defence Minister Rajnath Singh and BJP working president JP Nadda at the BJP parliamentary party meeting on Tuesday. (Express photo by Anil Sharma)Prime Minister Narendra Modi has asked all BJP MPs to undertake a 150-km padayatra (march) in their constituencies between October 2 and 31 in an effort to make celebrations of Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary an opportunity to reach out to villages and semi-urban areas. ‘Kulbhushan Jadhav will get justice’: PM Modi after ICJ verdict After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Kulbhushan Jadhav ICJ Verdict: Govt, Oppn hail ruling; PM Modi says truth prevailed Advertising The Prime Minister is learnt to have urged them to make the exercise an occasion to interact with people at the booth level and also advised them to keep the programme “apolitical.”Addressing a BJP Parliamentary Party meeting on Tuesday, Modi suggested that padayatras can be conducted from October 2 up to January 30, the death anniversary of Gandhi.“It is for the party to decide on the timing,” Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pralhad Joshi said after the meeting. Advertisingcenter_img Modi has asked even Rajya Sabha members to visit constituencies where the BJP organisation is weak, Joshi said. “The Prime Minister told MPs that everyone should carry out a 150-km padayatra in their constituencies during the period starting from October 2, the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, to October 31, the birth anniversary of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel,” he told the media.According to a BJP leader, Modi suggested that the programme should be “apolitical” since it is the occasion of the 150th birth anniversary of the Mahatma.With the government and ruling BJP planning a big celebration to mark the 150th birth anniversary of Gandhi, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, in her Budget speech last week, had announced that the government is working on “Gandhipedia”, a repository of information about the life and works of Mahatma Gandhi. This will will educate and sensitise the young generation about the Mahatma, the minister said.Sharing details of the proposed programme, Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs Arjun Ram Meghwal said the Prime Minister underlined that these padayatras should focus on villages and reaching out to the people there. “Modi-ji told MPs that 150 groups should be formed in each constituency, which will cover 150 km and party MPs will be part of these groups. The idea is to reach out to the public and seek their feedback on the government’s work and their expectations from us,” Meghwal said. Best Of Express PM Narendra Modi pulls up ministers for being absent in House Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield The minister said Modi underlined that Gandhi and villages will be the focus and MPs should discuss Gandhian thoughts with the people. The Prime Minister also suggested that plantation of trees, cleanliness and other issues related to village life can become part of the planned marches, Meghwal said.Sitharaman also addressed the BJP MPs at the meeting and explained key features of the Budget. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_imgA journalists’ group had confirmed on Friday that two journalists were among the dead; Somali-Canadian journalist Hodan Naleyah, the founder of Integration TV, and Mohamed Sahal Omar, reporter of SBC TV in Kismayu.Separately, Mohamed Ibrahim Moalimuu, general secretary of the Federation of Somali Journalists, said in a statement: “We are saddened and outraged by this loss of life, and condemn in the strongest possible terms this appalling massacre.”Al Shabaab was ejected from Mogadishu in 2011 and has since been driven from most of its other strongholds. It was driven out of Kismayu in 2012. The city’s port had been a major source of revenue for the group from taxes, charcoal exports, and levies on arms and other illegal imports.Kismayu is the commercial capital of Jubbaland, a region of southern Somalia still partly controlled by al Shabaab.Al Shabaab remains a major security threat, with fighters frequently carrying out bombings in Somalia and neighboring Kenya, whose troops form part of the African Union-mandated peacekeeping force that helps defend the Somali government. Advertising Car bomb and all-night hotel siege kill 26 in Somalia’s Kismayo Somalia extremist attack in port city of Kismayo kills 10 “The operation is over,” police officer Major Mohamed Abdi told Reuters by telephone from Kismayu.”So far we know 13 people died. Many people have been rescued. The four attackers were shot dead.”Members of the al-Qaeda linked group stormed the hotel after targeting it with a car bomb on Friday while local elders and lawmakers were meeting to discuss approaching regional elections. A second witness put the death toll at 14.“The operation was concluded at 7 a.m. We know at least 14 people died including journalists and (local election)candidates. These are prominent people. The death toll is sure to rise,” local elder Ahmed Abdulle told Reuters. Advertising Explained: Is Somalia ready for a one-person one-vote election? By Reuters |Mogadishu | Published: July 13, 2019 6:26:31 pm Related News Somalia, Somalia militant attack, Somalia attack, Kismayo, Kismayo attack, Somalia attack death, Al-Shabab, Al-Shabab attack, world news, Indian Express news Somali people gather near destroyed buildings after a car bomb detonated in Mogadishu, Somalia. (AP)Somalia’s security forces on Saturday ended an overnight attack by the al Shabaab Islamist militant group on a hotel in the southern port city of Kismayu that killed at least 13, a police officer said. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img Section 144 in Bengal town after TMC, BJP workers clash In their plea filed on June 11, Ajitesh Kumar and his wife Sakshi Mishra said they fear for their lives following threats from her father, brother, and their aides.Last week, a video went viral on social media in which Sakshi claimed that her father was threatening them of dire consequences since he allegedly did not approve of their wedding. “Through this video, I want to say that in future if something happens to me or Abhi or any of his family members, then my father, Vicky Bhartaul, and Rajeev Rana would be responsible for it, especially Rajeev Rana who has arrived with his entire team and is chasing me. I will die, but I will wipe out his entire family,” she said in the video. Advertising Advertising Neeraj Shekhar joins BJP, says country safe under Modi, Shah “Today Sakshi and Ajitesh was to be present in the court and on court order they were brought in police protection. This is a matter or concern that a victim was beaten up inside the court premises for the first time. The incident took place possibly because the two belonged to different castes. The court has taken suo-moto cognisance of the matter and showing seriousness has called the district administration,” the couple’s lawyer told reporters.The lawyer added that Ajitesh was beaten up even in the past. No complaint has been filed with the police in connection with the incident so far.The court proceeding started without any further issue, a police official said, adding that the matter is being investigated and soon whole information will be in front of us. By Express News Service |Lucknow | Updated: July 15, 2019 1:42:57 pm Vicky Bhartaul, Rajesh Mishra, UP Bareily MLA, Dalit, Rajeev Rana, UP BJP, BJP, Sakshi Mishra, inter caste marriage, UP Police, UP Crime, Pappu Bhartaul, Indian Express Sakshi and Ajitesh got married on July 4.A Dalit man who married BJP Bareilly MLA Rajesh Mishra’s daughter was allegedly assaulted by some unidentified persons on Monday morning when the couple went to Allahabad High Court seeking protection. The police, however, said there was a scuffle between two groups of lawyers in the court premises and no one was beaten up. Eyeing OBC cadre,UP unit chief is a Kurmi Related News 31 Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Speaking at a conclave in New Delhi on Thursday, Tharoor, who has been elected to the Lok Sabha from Thiruvananthapuram in Kerala thrice in a row since 2009, said he believes he has done his job properly and that is the reason why people have reposed faith in him.After the recent Lok Sabha election results, critics attributed the loss of Congress leader Rahul Gandhi from his family’s pocket borough Amethi to his disconnect with the voters of that constituency.Tharoor, though, pointed towards only MPs from the BJP and those from northern India in support of his contention.“MPs, particularly those from the north, who have a slightly different relationship with their constituencies and are less frequently seen there has a rough time,” he said. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield ‘Scorpion’ remark against PM Modi: Delhi court grants bail to Shashi Tharoor Related News The third edition of the South Asia Conclave organised by Oxford University Press witnessed researchers, policymakers, bureaucrats, academicians, and journalists from debating contemporary ideas that define modern South Asia.The conclave closely examined the key issues impacting the region, such as political challenges related to ethnic and religious diversity, identity politics, ethnic violence, terrorism, separatism, governance, economic growth, gender consciousness, national security, changes in culture and social structure as well as the significance of diaspora. Hindi imposition? How political leaders across parties are reacting to draft National Education Policy “They are the ones who can perhaps win only in Narendra Modi’s name and they do, like this time. But for most of us what differentiates us is precisely the work we do in our constituencies,” he said.He said people re-elected him as they believe that he has done his job properly.“People have seen me, seen me attending to their needs and that’s why they have trusted and voted for me.”Tharoor was speaking on the topic “Clients and Constituents: Political Responsiveness in Patronage Democracies” which is also the title of a book by academician Jennifer Bussell. Best Of Express center_img Govt introduces triple talaq Bill in Lok Sabha, Congress’ Shashi Tharoor calls it ‘class legislation’ Advertising By PTI |New Delhi | Published: July 12, 2019 5:04:37 pm Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Post Comment(s) Shashi Tharoor, Shashi Tharoor at conclave, Congress MP Shashi Tharoor, Shashi Tharoor at South Asia Conclave, Shashi Tharoor New Delhi, Oxford Publication, Delhi news, MP Constituency, National news, Indian Express news Congress MP Shashi Tharoor. (File)Parliamentarians who have a slightly different relationship with their constituencies and are less frequently seen there has a rough time, according to Congress MP Shashi Tharoor. Advertisinglast_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 4 2018A new article published today in The Lancet Oncology shows 39 percent of large B cell lymphoma patients treated with the chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T) Yescarta® (axicabtagene ciloleucel) remained in remission more than two years (27.1 months median follow up) following therapy, and more than half of the patients treated remain alive. The new long-term safety and activity results of the ZUMA-1 clinical trial were also presented Sunday, Dec. 2 at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in San Diego.”This therapy has been a game-changer for patients with large B cell lymphoma who have failed two or more lines of therapy. Our ZUMA-1 clinical trial data show durable response beyond 2 years for nearly 40 percent of patients who had almost no chance for complete responses with conventional chemotherapy,” said Frederick Locke, M.D., lead author of the article and associate member and vice chair of the Blood and Marrow Transplant and Cellular Immunotherapy Department, and co-leader of the Immunology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center. “Importantly, ongoing remission 2 years after initial chemotherapy for large B cell lymphoma is predictive of a cure, giving us hope that lymphoma will never return for many of the patients remaining in remission 2 years after axicabtagene ciloleucel.”Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer risk”Large B cell lymphoma is an aggressive, fast-growing disease. Patients can be treated with chemotherapy or if they are well enough, a stem cell transplant. However, there are not many treatment options for patients when they refractory disease. For those patients, CAR T has proven to be a option that can provide durable remission,” said Julio Chavez, M.D., assistant member of the Malignant Hematology Department at Moffitt and co-author of the study.Moffitt co-led the national, multi-center ZUMA-1 trial, serving as the first cancer center to treat patients with axicabtagene ciloleucel in the investigational setting. Patients enrolled in the study, 108 in total, had large B cell lymphoma or its variants and not responded to their prior chemotherapy or were relapsed within 1 year of a stem cell transplant. The results of the ZUMA-1 trial supported FDA approval of the therapy in October 2017. Following approval, Moffitt was the first center to treat patients with standard of care axicabtagene ciloleucel.CAR T is a personalized therapy using a patient’s own immune cells, or T cells, to fight cancer. For this treatment, a patient’s T cells are removed and engineered with additional receptors to help identify, attack and ultimately destroy the cancer cells. The re-engineered T cells are then infused back into the patient’s body in a single treatment, enabling the body’s immune system to better combat the disease.Source: https://moffitt.org/newsroom/press-release-archive/2018/new-two-year-data-show-39-percent-of-non-hodgkin-lymphoma-patients-treated-with-car-t-cell-therapy-remain-in-remission/last_img read more

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 3 2019With over 20% of the population in industrial countries engaging shift work – in sectors such as healthcare and transportation – we urgently need to understand its health burden.Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes.The study specifically suggested that shift work has a negative impact on the way a type of fat (called triglycerides) is broken down, as well as on the way sugar is utilised in our bodies. Both of these increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes because they affect how our body processes sugar and fat.Related StoriesStroke should be treated 15 minutes earlier to save lives, study suggestsStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsResearchers at the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi conducted the research on two groups of healthcare workers. The first group included nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers aged 20 to 40 of both sexes who had not done night shift in the last one year or ever and had normal blood sugar levels. The second group was of the same professional background and age, but involved in rotational night shift duties (more than 4 nights duties per month at least for last one year) and had normal blood sugar levels.Blood sugar levels were measured using an oral glucose tolerance test. Then, after 12 hours of overnight fasting, participants were given a high fat meal. Fasting insulin levels, and triglyceride levels, after fasting and after the meal, were measured in all of the study participants. These were compared between health care workers with and without night shift duties.Lead author on the study, SV Madhu said:”This study gives us a better understanding of why shift work is associated, in the long-term, with heart and metabolic diseases, helping us work towards reducing the incidence of heart disease, diabetes and obesity in the future.” Source:http://www.physoc.org/last_img read more